ManageYourEmotions

Managing Your Emotions

In our Amazon Top-10 Business book, Step Up–Lead in Six Moments That Matter, we have a chapter called Get Angry, Not Stupid and we also have a previous blog with the same name. The idea is that it’s okay to feel and express feelings like anger or frustration, even at work, as long as you can express those emotions in an intelligent and productive way; one that you will feel proud of later.

Most of you are familiar with the famous Amygdala Hijack. This is when a primal part of your brain senses or perceives danger, and, as a reaction, takes blood out of your pre-frontal lobe (where intelligent thought occurs) and pushes blood into your arms and legs so you can fight or take flight.

Some of the foundational work we do with leaders is coaching them to manage their emotions when they are feeling hijacked. How do we remain intelligent and objective, when facing challenging situations and/or people? It’s not always easy but it gets easier with focused practice. The feelings you experience are joined by physiological changes in your body. Afflictive emotions might make your chest tight, your breathing shallow, your hands clench into fists, your shoulders tense, or your jaw tighten. In other words, your body always gives you a heads-up that you are about to realize a feeling. When you sense that, you are getting hijacked by your amygdala. Here are two of the four techniques we offer in our book that can help you stay intelligent. (If you have the book, you will find the details starting on page 24):

Breathing. Deep, controlled breaths help restore blood back into the neo-cortex and stop the production of the chemicals that cause you to react suddenly and with great force. Sometimes it’s hard to take a deep breath when upset. In those moments, try breathing out. Do it now. Breathe all the air out through your mouth and you will notice that you cannot help but take a deep breath in.
Breathing out through your mouth may work well while sitting alone but may not work quite as well when sitting at a meeting or a dinner table surrounded with people looking at you. So, try an alternative for those situations. Slowly push the air out of your lungs through your nose. Again, you will notice that you can’t help but breathe in afterwards. Really, try it now. I promise you will have more oxygen available to you after you breathe out.

Questioning. When you ask your brain a question — any question — it forces blood back into the neo-cortex where intelligent thought occurs. So when you are triggered, ask yourself a question. Start with simple questions. What did I eat for breakfast yesterday? What is the last good movie I saw? What time did I wake up yesterday?
While any question will produce the desired result of a calmer emotional state and more rational thinking; as you progress in this practice, you can ask more sophisticated questions that are appropriate to the situation at hand. What can I say to make this person feel safe right now? What am I really trying to accomplish in this situation? What can I say or do to build this relationship?

Managing your emotions in the moment is not always easy. It requires practicing these techniques when you’re not being hijacked, so that they are readily available to you when you are.
Remember that your body will give you a heads-up. If you are aware of what is happening in your body, you can interrupt the cycle, stay at the stage in which you are simply irritated, and not let your emotions get out of hand.

Thank you, we look forward to hearing your thoughts. Let us know how you are doing.

As always, we appreciate your attention, and for additional ideas, follow me on twitter: @HenryJEvans

Like us on Facebook to share your experiences, or email us at moreinfo@dynamicresults.com.

Thank you.

Eradicate Excuses Image

Eradicate Excuses at Work in Three Easy Steps

What’s Your Excuse?

What are the three excuses you use most often?

With more than 10,000 hours of executive coaching experience, my observation is that everyone, even the highest performing people use excuses when they miss a deadline or break a promise. When we offer excuses to others, we lose credibility and trust.

The first step to Eradicate Excuses in the Workplace™ is to shift our focus from the easy work of noticing when other people are giving excuses, to the harder and more impactful work of noticing when we do it ourselves.

Here are some of my excuses:

• I was on travel
• Yesterday was too busy

These are not explanations; they are excuses; (explanations are okay).

In fact, being on travel and having a busy day doesn’t change the fact that I had the exact same amount of time as every other person on the planet, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

We do a deep dive on this in our Accountability Trainings and while we can’t cover our entire method in a two-minute video, we can give you the basics.

We invite you to Eradicate Excuses in the Workplace™ by following three easy steps.

Identify the excuse. One example is my personal favorite: “I was on travel”
Replace the excuse with an explanation like “I didn’t make it a priority”
State your call to action: “Here is when I will do it,” which is why this person came to speak with you in the first place.

They want to know what you WILL do, not WHY you didn’t do it.

When I said “I was on travel”, a more accountable replacement would have been “I’m sorry I didn’t keep the commitment. I was on travel and didn’t make it a priority. You will see the report in Excel format by 3pm PT, tomorrow, January 10″.

Now, how do you start eradicating your own excuses?

Start by writing down the three excuses you use most often. Then, add some more accountable language to replace those excuses.

Feel free to call your own excuses out in the moment. If you catch yourself saying something like “I was on travel”, say, “You know what, that’s an excuse. I didn’t make it a priority yesterday and I will tomorrow. Expect to see the report in your inbox by 10:00 am, CT tomorrow”.

Use this video in a team meeting to identify the excuses you use most often as individuals and as a team.

Make operating agreements to replace that language with clear explanations, followed immediately by a firm and specific call to action.

In upcoming months, we will be talking about other aspects of Eradicating Excuses in the Workplace™ like:

• Understanding the difference between an explanation and an excuse.

Thank you, we look forward to hearing your thoughts. Let us know how you are doing.

As always, we appreciate your attention, and for additional ideas, follow me on twitter: @HenryJEvans

Like us on Facebook to share your experiences, or email us at moreinfo@dynamicresults.com.

Thank you.

Prioritization Filter

Prioritization Filter – How to get real about your ‘to do’ list

Over the years, I’ve amassed more than 10,000 hours of coaching CEO’s and others in the c-suite. During that time, I’ve learned and also developed practices to make high performing leaders, perform at even higher levels.

Today, we’re sharing a process we published in our Amazon Top Ten Business book, Step Up, Lead in Six Moments that Matter, called The Prioritization Filter (pg. 78).

You have a to-do list. If you are like the rest of humanity, you don’t do everything on that list, even if you intend to. When we coach others, part of that effort is in helping people realize what is realistic. For this conversation, it is about putting your “to-do” list into three categories.

Execution: Own it. You have already, or you will immediately assign the resources required to get this done yourself. The resources we’re talking about are generally your time and the organizations money. Another way of viewing this is your, “I will do it” category.

Delegation: You will ask someone else to align their time and effort to accomplishing the task. You’re not doing the actual work yourself, and you are being thoughtful enough to recruit or assign someone else so that the work is completed. Think of this as the, “I’ll find someone else to do this” category.

Finally, we have the category most people are missing, even if they are otherwise high performing. We call this Elimination: Get honest with yourself and decide, or in some cases admit to yourself, that you won’t be doing this. For example, if tasks you’ve been meaning to complete for a long time, show evidence that you won’t do them, why not throw them out and acknowledge that? If that decision makes you nervous, you must assign resources through one of the previous categories, execution, or delegation. Otherwise, call this category, “I won’t do this“. Sometimes, this involves calling people and having a tough conversation where you renegotiate your original commitment.

Prioritization Filter Branded

(Click Image for detail)

Taken from page 78 of our Amazon Top 10, Best-Selling Book; ‘Step Up, Lead In Six Moments That Matter

If you use this tool to sort your “to-do” list, once a week, you will notice yourself doing what is most important and you will travel home feeling like what you didn’t get done, was less important that what you did get done.

Our intention is, that by watching this video, you have learned how to apply this practice. If you would like a downloadable image of the Prioritization Filter and/or a deeper explanation, you will find both in our book, on and leading up to page 78.

As always, we appreciate your attention, and for additional ideas, follow me on twitter: @HenryJEvans

Like us on Facebook to share your experiences, or email us at moreinfo@dynamicresults.com.

Thank you.

Decide Already

Decide Already! How to get decisions made, no matter your title.

In order to be competitive as an individual, team, or organization, you need agility and speed in this rapidly changing marketplace. This means that decisions must be made faster than your competitors, and your plans executed with excellence.

In the Amazon top-10 business book I co-authored with Dr. Colm Foster, Step Up, Lead in Six Moments That Matter, we dedicated a chapter showing how to accomplish this.

Here are two of the ways our clients are able to outpace their competitors in decision making.

First: You can bring a team to a decision with or without the formal authority to do so by “Reversing the momentum of negative interactions”.

This means that when you notice a team is stuck in discussing a problem, you say or do something to shift the energy toward finding a solution, by saying something like “I think we’ve done a great job of establishing the problem, what are we going to do about it? What’s our next step?” This type of momentum reversal is a kind of judo move that anyone can do whether CEO, new hire, or anywhere in-between.

Second: There is no such thing as a perfect plan. So please, Don’t Wait for Perfection.

As one of the keystones of our practice, we help organizations write and execute their strategies. Although every challenge is unique, we have found this constant truth: An 80 percent complete strategy brilliantly executed always beats a 100 percent finished strategy badly executed. As General George S. Patton said, “A good plan violently executed now is better than a perfect plan executed next week.”

We have worked with organizations who tend to get stuck in analysis paralysis while trying to complete a project. Sometimes a strategic-planning client wants to reassess and reevaluate their carefully thought-out initiatives rather than begin implementing them. We call this the postponed perfection syndrome.

According to Harvard research, in using our Accountability Method™, our clients implement their strategies at almost 8x the rate of most organizations. They’ve learned how to make and execute their decisions, even when outcomes are uncertain. They achieve greatness because they are willing to take action during unstable times, when their competitors would rather play it safe by talking instead of doing.

Our clients have learned that if you have 4 out of 5 data points needed to make a decision – Make That Decision! Having all five data points is not a guarantee of anything, as your changing environment and/or new data may require a change. An 80% solution is usually enough to get started.

We would rather see our clients follow a procedure we call Decide, Execute, Adjust.

1. Decide how you will begin doing something,
2. Begin doing it (get out ahead of your competitors), and
3. Stay present and aware of data telling you when and how you need to change.

Make your next step identifying a decision your team is failing to make and invite them to crystalize and begin to execute what some of your team members may still be calling “an imperfect plan”.

Say something like “I think we have enough information to proceed with a decision” or “Can we begin to execute based on the information we have and adjust as we go?”

While this type of action may not be completely comfortable for everyone on your team, it will keep you ahead of your competitors.

As always, we appreciate your attention, and for additional ideas, follow me on twitter: @HenryJEvans

Like us on Facebook to share your experiences, or email us at moreinfo@dynamicresults.com.

Thank you.

April 2015 Blog Video

3 Rules for Choosing Your Accountability Partner & Getting Better Business Results

Today we want to talk to you about three rules for Driving Results through Accountability Partners.

We all know the concept of an accountability partner: Someone with whom we share our commitments, knowing that they will hold us accountable and responsible for executing what we told them we would do by when we said we would do it.

Here are some pitfalls of choosing the wrong accountability partner, along with some best practices for knowing whom you should pick.

Number One: Pick someone at the peer level: You should not pick your boss, and you should not pick any of your employees. Why? If you have people who work for you, or if you are working for someone, they may (or may not) have your best interests at heart. You want your partner to be someone at your peer level or someone outside of your organization.

When people are writing your performance review, (or when you are writing someone else’s), you are very unlikely to completely ignore things they told you they are trying to accomplish; things that you know they are not succeeding at.

Example: you might be writing a performance review for someone who is doing a fairly good job at work; and has said they are also trying to lose weight, cut back on Facebook time, and also, quit smoking. Because you know they failed at those, your perception is just a little bit lower than it might otherwise have been. And you, if you are like most human beings, are going on some level to let that impact your review. That would not be fair, because he or she is being rated on business performance, not on anything outside of business.

Number Two: Choose someone who has your best interests at heart. Further, we don’t want you to choose a person you are in competition with. So let’s talk about peers. If I have a peer that I am competing with, either for resources, or a promotion, that person is not a good accountability partner. My accountability partner has to have my best interests at heart.

Number Three: Choose someone who will be assertive and has the courage to tell me when I am messing up; or to challenge me when I am falling behind on a project, so I can achieve my desired business results, on time.

Having chosen an accountability partner, the burden is now on me to make it emotionally safe to challenge me when I am not keeping my commitments (and that’s what a coach must be able to do). So whether your accountability partner is a coach whom you hire externally, or someone whom you work with as a peer, or someone outside of the organization:

• We recommend that you get a partner, and soon.
• We recommend that you proactively publish your commitments and goals to that person; and
• That you make them feel emotionally safe when they do hold you accountable.

These are just a few of the ways you can drive better business results through using accountability partners.

Thank you for your continued interest, and we look forward to bringing you additional insights from our experts in future blogs.

If you want to learn more about Stepping Up, contact us.

As always, we welcome your comments. Join us on Facebook to share your experiences, or email us at moreinfo@dynamicresults.com.

leadership-balance-thumb

Leadership in Balance

Hi, I’m Dr. Colm Foster, Senior Associate at Dynamic Results, and with my colleague Henry Evans, I co-authored Step Up, Lead In Six Moments That Matter. You can stay current with my ideas by following me on Twitter at @DrColmFoster.

When working with our clients to develop Core Competency Models, they sometimes ask us about Key Leadership Traits and whether leaders are born or made. Much has been written about this topic. We believe that leadership is a developable skill but that the personality does play a role.

Based on our work coaching and developing leaders, we believe optimism is a critical leadership trait. Holding a positive view of the future is a key part of leading teams and indeed of leading oneself. It’s also fundamental to bouncing back from setbacks; we sometimes refer to this as leadership resilience.

However, unbridled optimism can lead to unhealthy outcomes. In fact, in another blog, Henry and I talked about the value of pessimism and how to leverage it for better relationships and business outcomes.

When working with our clients we encourage them to temper their optimism with good reality testing. This means grounding your optimism with a solid grasp of the situation you are facing.

So, our definition of the ideal leader?

A person with high optimism – balanced with good reality testing.

This sounds something like: I fully understand and appreciate all of the obstacles we face and knowing all of that I remain confident that we can deliver against our strategy objectives.

Thank you for your continued interest. We look forward to bringing you additional Insights From Our Experts in future blogs.

If you or your team want to deep dive on Stepping Up, contact us for information on keynotes, workshops and custom programs meant to ignite leadership at every level of your organization. Email Ede Ericson Cardell at: moreinfo@dynamicresults.com, or call 214-742-1403 x 106.

attack-the-idea-not-the-person

Attack the Idea, Not the Person

 


With the successful launch of our new book, “Step Up, Lead In Six Moments That Matter” and with the global success of our best-selling book “Winning With Accountability, The Secret Language of High Performing Organizations” (now with over 100,000 in print), we are offering you some of our best insights and practices to create an Accountability Culture in, and generate leadership at every level of your organization.


Henry Evans, Managing Partner, and Dr. Colm Foster, Senior Associate at Dynamic Results, are co-authors of “Step Up, Lead In Six Moments That Matter”. They are talking today about a problem we call ‘terminal politeness’.

Follow Colm and Henry on Twitter: @DrColmFoster @HenryJEvans

We often experience and diagnose terminal politeness in client organizations we work with. What we mean is, sometimes people are avoiding critical dialogues that they would be much better served having. This could be because they don’t recognize the need to have them, they don’t want to hurt someone’s feelings, they don’t want to overload someone or they might be afraid of how the other person might react. Whatever their reasons are, avoiding these critical issues can lead to a state of mediocrity. It can sometimes lead to people thinking, feeling and acting like we are okay just as we are and we have no need to improve.

While that may be and feel okay at the time, if you have a dynamic environment and/or a competitor who is willing to have these discussions real time, it can lead you and your team having to have these critical conversations when it is too late. We believe the answer is to generate constructive conflict in your organization.

Imagine a situation where I might say something that is completely stupid. How would you respond to that idea, demonstrating constructive conflict?

For instance:

We do strategic planning and leadership team offsites for clients, they take all day, I think we ought to get into the hot dog business! Our clients have to eat, why should we make money on feeding them?

Attack the Idea:

Henry, generally, I like and agree with your ideas. But, I am struggling to understand how getting into food service is going to serve our business, what might I be missing?

What did Colm just do? He expressed confidence in our relationship and in my capability. Afterward, he directly attacked my idea without me being personally attacked and perhaps more importantly, without any need to defend myself.

Here is an example when we were facilitating a meeting with clients. They were trying to solve a major cash flow problem. One of them suggests, maybe we should liquidate all of our inventory? His colleague said, hey, that’s a stupid idea. We will have nothing to sell and you will create a customer service disaster.

That executive could have expressed that same sentiment in a slightly different way. It might have sounded like this: I know that you are looking for solutions that are going to generate quick cash flow for us. I also know you are committed to maintaining a high level of customer service, but, I am really failing to see how your last suggestion is going to do that. I think it would cause serious interruption to our service levels and what I would like to know from you is how can we maintain our service levels and still generate a quick cash flow?

In short, you can avoid terminal politeness by generating appropriate, healthy conflict. One of the ways to do this is to attack the idea, not the person. You can get a deep dive on this in our new book, “Step Up, Lead In Six Moments That Matter”.

Keep in mind, the other person is the judge of whether you have done this effectively or not. If they felt attacked, you have to show up differently with them next time.

We always look forward to bringing you real life examples in our blogs. If you and your team ever want to do a deep dive on stepping up, contact us for information on keynotes, workshops and custom programs meant to ignite leadership at every level of your organization.

For more information on how to bring the method to your team or about any of the services we offer, contact Ede Ericson Cardell, Director of Operations at moreinfo@dynamicresults.com or 214-742-1403 x 106.

Driving Business Results Through Accountability Reframing

Leading From Without

In celebration of our tenth year and with the global success of our best-selling book “Winning With Accountability, The Secret Language of High Performing Organizations” (now in its ninth printing) we are offering you some of our best insights and practices to create an Accountability Culture in your workplace.


Hi, I’m Henry Evans, founder of Dynamic Results and author of the best-selling business book “Winning with Accountability: The Secret Language of High Performing Organizations.” Today we’re talking about what we call, Leading From Without™.

A few days ago I was working with a $7 billion dollar client organization, specifically one of their senior leaders. He opened up to me and explained that after exceeding all targets set for them last year, as a reward, their global office had given them even more aggressive targets this year. His team didn’t see how they could hit these targets and they asked him to explain how they could. He told me that he didn’t have the answer, didn’t see the solution and didn’t know what to do.

I went in to this discussion armed with the information that he was very happy with the team he had and felt that he worked with smart and talented people.

Leaning on my emotional intelligence training, I asked him how he felt about being vulnerable? Could he tell them that while he was committed to hitting the targets, he didn’t have the answer either and wanted to hear their ideas about how working together? Could he simply ask them, “How can we do this?”

In short, that is exactly what he did. His team immediately switched from worrying about the problem to working on a solution. Our client lead with transparency, not arrogance. He lead with honesty and a request for help, rather than trying to “lead from the front” and have all the answers.

We feel that relationships are built and strengthened in moments of vulnerability like this example. We prove that when we admit to our team that we don’t see the way – while still demonstrating a commitment to finding a solution. Sometimes, you can be a leader by leading from without (having all the answers).

We encourage you to give this “leading from without” a try. This can work regardless of your position or title. If dealing with a boss who expects you to have all the answers, try saying something like “I feel confident you see how to do this, and right now, I don’t. Would you help me think it through?”

We are speaking more about leading from anywhere on the org chart in our upcoming book, “Step Up, Lead in Six Moments that Matter”. As always, we appreciate your time and attention. For additional ideas, follow me on twitter: @HenryJEvans

For more information on how to bring the method to your team or about any of the services we offer, contact Ede Ericson Cardell, Director of Operations at moreinfo@dynamicresults.com or 214-742-1403 x 106.


Want to know more about creating accountable cultures? Take our free assessment and buy the book here. http://www.dynamicresults.com/book/

As always, we welcome your comments. Like us on Facebook to share your experiences or email us at moreinfo@dynamicresults.com.

Driving Business Results Through Accountability Reframing

Driving Results through our Accountability Method – Reframing

In celebration of our tenth year and with the global success of our best-selling book “Winning With Accountability, The Secret Language of High Performing Organizations” (now in its eighth printing) we are offering you some of our best insights and practices to create an Accountability Culture in your workplace.


Hi, I’m Henry Evans, founder of Dynamic Results and author of “Winning with Accountability: The Secret Language of High Performing Organizations.” We’ve been talking to you about how you can drive better business results through our accountability method, and today we want to focus on one aspect of that, how you can reframe your thought cycle when you’re going to a meeting. You know a lot of meetings – they suck, I’m of the belief, after observing thousands of meetings in my career, sometimes we are the reason why. Sometimes, I am the reason why. Let’s look at how my attitude might impact a meeting.

Let’s say I’m going into a meeting, and I’ve got a bad attitude about it because it hasn’t been a productive meeting in the past, I haven’t enjoyed it, or maybe I don’t like one of the people in the meeting. Maybe one of the people in the meeting doesn’t like me. Whatever the motivation is, whatever the reason is, I’m going into this meeting in a state of mind that indicates that I’m not going to show up at my personal best. Wherever you are on the organizational chart, this might be relevant for you. I’m going into this meeting and my first thought is, “I hate this weekly meeting.” We call this a negative thought cycle, I want you to follow this. I’m thinking, I hate this meeting: what mood is that going to place me in? I’m going to be cranky, irritable, and upset. If I’m in that cranky, irritable, upset mood, my behavior’s going to be impacted. I’m going to have limited participation, I’m probably going to be a little withdrawn—I may even make a bunch of negative comments, which has me leaving that meeting feeling like I was victimized, like I was dragged into a bad meeting. I feel really powerless. Then I’m going into that meeting next week feeling even worse. I’m not thinking, “I hate this weekly meeting,” now I’m thinking, “I really hate it; it did really suck last week,” and I may be ignoring my own contribution to that. Stacy Colino wrote that, “emotions are like germs—they’re contagious.” If I’m going into this meeting in a state of hatred that might be impacting the other people in the meeting, and it might make the meeting worse.

Let’s look at that same meeting that I hate, but I’m going to tweak my thinking just a little. We’re going to call this a positive thought cycle. I’m now going into the meeting; instead of thinking that I hate it, saying, “I’m going to make a contribution in today’s meeting.” That changes my mood. If I’m going in with that intention, I’m now a little curious, I’m calmer, and I‘m more open-minded, so the way I behave is different. I fully participate; I’m more thoughtful, I’m more relational, and I add some value. I probably receive a little more value, too, and I leave feeling confident. What does that confidence do next week? I’m not going into that meeting now thinking that I might make a contribution; I’m going in thinking that I will make one.

We want you to switch these negative thought cycles to positive ones, whether you’re talking about a meeting you don’t like, or a person that you don’t enjoy interacting with. Instead of thinking, “This person fails me all the time and I don’t like them,” you might go into an interaction with them thinking, “I’m going to make a contribution to this person and help them improve.” These little tweaks in thinking are what we observe our highest performing clients doing on a regular basis. They are driving results through accountability, out-performing their industries with this kind of behavior. We appreciate you taking a few minutes to hear this concept of switching negative thought cycles to positive thought cycles. Our certified facilitators are always ready to come into your organization and help you drive better business results through our accountability method using emotional intelligence. Thank you.

As always, we welcome your comments. Like us on Facebook to share your experiences or email us at moreinfo@dynamicresults.com.

For more information on how to bring the method to your team or about any of the services we offer, contact Ede Ericson Cardell at moreinfo@dynamicresults.com or 214-742-1403 x 106.

Find this article useful? If so, you might enjoy our book.

competitive advantage

Accountability as a Competitive Advantage: Driving Results through our Accountability Method

In celebration of our tenth year and with the global success of our best-selling book “Winning With Accountability, The Secret Language of High Performing Organizations” (now in its eighth printing) we are offering you some of our best insights and practices to create an Accountability Culture in your workplace.


Hi, I’m Henry Evans, founder of Dynamic Results and author of “Winning with Accountability: The Secret Language of High Performing Organizations.” Last month, I talked to you about the importance of creating clear visual expectations—a cornerstone of our accountability method—and making sure you get reflection back from people, so that you’re more focused on what they heard than on what you said.

We want to tell you that we have clients that are out-performing their industries in a big way. We have clients that are market leaders in over twenty-eight segments right now. One of the reasons our clients out-perform their competitors and have a competitive advantage is because of the language that they use. I’m going to give you a few ways that different functions in your company can leverage some of the language that we talked about last month to gain a competitive advantage in the marketplace.

Let’s talk about your sales team first: What if your sales team saw our video last month and they were going into meetings focused on creating crystal clear clarity and then visual expectations with all of your clients, and getting reflection back from those clients before they write an order? What we mean is, imagine that they never assumed that they understood what the client wanted, and they were constantly reflecting what they heard in their own words in a paraphrased way to get that kind of clarity—and more importantly, to build that kind of confidence in their client’s mind before they wrote an order. They lead the rest of your organization in delivering expectations to your clients, we think these clear expectations go a long way in that capacity. This very simple practice is overlooked by many sales teams.

Your company doesn’t just run on sales. Let’s look at your back end—let’s look at I.T. What if when your I.T. pros have your employees coming to them with these ambiguous requests like, “Hey, can you make my computer work better so I can multitask?” Your I.T. people started to either paraphrase back what they think the person really meant, they might say something like, “What I hear you saying is that you really need to see a split-screen effect on your laptop, and you want to see your training video on one side and you want to be able to make notes in a Word document on the other side.” By creating this reflection, by paraphrasing, they’re either affirming the understanding or they’re clarifying it. They start to bring better service to your team by simply tweaking their language when these requests and commitments are being made.

In executive meetings (and that’s where I spend most of my time, working with the leaders)—if you want to drive results through accountability, you need to change the way you speak when you’re making and requesting your commitments. What if executive meetings sounded less like this, “Let’s get our employees more engaged,” and sounded more like this, “I suggest that we need a 5% drop in attrition by September thirtieth, and the we raise our engagement survey by an average score of 2%.”

Clarity takes time. We know you’re busy—we’re suggesting that if you take a few extra moments to set clearer expectations before the work is done, it saves you a lot of time in the long run. When I was a process consultant, I used to hear in companies, particularly in manufacturing, justify all of these terrible manufacturing practices. They were basically saying to me that they didn’t have time to manufacture something right the first time, but they always had time to redo it or, in other words, to do it twice. That just doesn’t make sense.

We are always focused on giving you ways to focus your communications so you have increased accountability and increased efficiency in your interactions. Our certified facilitators are always ready to bring our accountability method in to your company for training purposes, and I look forward to seeing you next month. Thank you.

As always, we welcome your comments. Like us on Facebook to share your experiences or email us at moreinfo@dynamicresults.com.

For more information on how to bring the method to your team or about any of the services we offer, contact Ede Ericson Cardell, at moreinfo@dynamicresults.com or 214-742-1403 x 106.

Find this article useful? If so, you might enjoy our book.