Mastering Empathy Blog

Mastering Empathy in 3 Easy Steps: Building Better Relationships and Business Results through Managing Conflict

Let’s see if we can sharpen your empathy skills in 4 minutes or less.

Empathy, simply put, is expressing your understanding of how another person feels, leaving them feeling understood and heard. This is easy to do when you share their concern or care about their issue. It’s not so easy when you don’t care.

Has someone ever told you about a problem or brought you a complaint that mattered a lot to them and didn’t matter to you at all?

Perhaps you found yourself thinking “this isn’t a real problem” or “I can’t believe they are worried about something like this”.

Perhaps you don’t care about their opinion because their facts are completely wrong. Let’s roll with that example.

Suppose you and I work together and you don’t like working with me. This dislike has built up to a point where you are going to tell me about it. You say “Henry, I don’t like working with you because your hair is too long and I feel like you are always brushing it during our meetings.”

These facts are obviously wrong and if I had to go to court to argue against them, it wouldn’t take me long to persuade the jury and win the case. But what happens to our relationship if focusing on the facts is all I do? If your frustration energy was high when our interaction started, and all I do is argue the facts, it will most likely increase your negative charge, leave you even more frustrated, and permanently damage our relationship. So, how to fix this?

STEP ONE: Put their feelings before their facts. Try to remember a time when you didn’t want to work with someone and remember how that felt. Do that right now. You are probably naming feelings like “frustrating”, “unmotivating” or even “de-energizing”. If you can remember your feelings, you are halfway to creating a meaningful human connection with this person. Now all you have to do is express your understanding by saying something like:

“It sounds like working with me feels frustrating and you really don’t want to do it anymore. I too have felt the same way about a co-worker, and I don’t want you to have that experience with me.”

• Now, for STEP TWO: check in with the person to see if they now feel understood.

If they nod, or say “Yes, that’s what I meant”, they are feeling de-energized, more objective, and relieved that you understand them. Now you’re both ready to discuss the facts.

STEP THREE: When approaching the facts do what we call “using curiosity in lieu of judgement”. Instead of saying “You’re wrong because look, I’m bald” say “What led you to the opinion you just presented to me? I want to hear more about your perspective.” If your relationship is strong enough for some humor, you might ask “Really? Tell me, what color is my hair?”

For stronger relationships, dealing with feelings before facts will get you deeper, more rewarding and more productive relationships. It will also promote better business results.

karly pant dr website

Any One Of Us Can Make A Difference

Dear Friend,

As we transition into a new year, most people find little time for inspiration. At Dynamic Results, we were lucky enough to have a little holiday miracle fall into our laps. Please take a moment to read this true story, one written as a love letter from a mother to a daughter. We are especially proud as the mother is our Director of Operations, Ede Ericson, writing about the kindness and compassion of her daughter, Karly Granzen. Any of us can make a difference and this story already has over 100,000 likes on Facebook, and over 1,000,000 world wide.

From our family to your, may the next year be your best year.

Henry Evans, Founding Partner

karly pant suit nation

Original Facebook post:

This is the America I choose.

The image above is my daughter Karly. Recently, she had a tough day, she learned that she had just lost her job. It was a new role as a Project Lead and she was very excited about it. Due to funding cut backs, the grant money that had been promised had to be taken back by the state, so, too, Karly’s position. She was devastated.

But, life goes merrily on its way and so we must do what we do. And, off Karly went to get groceries.

A short note about my girl here. From day one, Karly has been the kind of human that has never met a stranger. She is Native American and Anglo. She has deep brown/black eyes and dark brown hair (well most of the time – she is 25, it gets colored quite often). But, there is something about her that is approachable, attractive and friendly.

People of all kinds talk to her, randomly, often and about all kinds of things, young and old.

As she approached the store there was a gentleman outside the entrance, who was cold and hungry and asked her for money to get some food. Karly told him she wouldn’t give him cash, but, she would be happy to buy him something to eat. She didn’t say anything to him about the fact that she had carefully planned out her shopping list so that she could get everything she needed with the exact amount she had withdrawn from the Credit Union. Instead, she simply asked him what he would like to eat.

He said it would be really nice to have a rotisserie chicken since it was already cooked and hot, and it was so cold outside. Karly said she would be right back and went in to buy his chicken.

When she came back out, she gave him the food. She also went over to her car and got out a coat and gave it to him as well.

She then went back into the store to do her shopping.

She carefully went through the store checking off each item on her list and adding everything up so she did not go over the total dollar amount she had left in cash. As she proceeded to the check-out lane and was getting ready to cash out the gentleman behind her in line told her he was going to pay for her groceries.

She was completely caught off guard.

He told her he had seen her act of generosity and kindness to the man in front of the store and he wanted to pay it forward by buying her groceries. He insisted and paid for everything.

This is the America I choose.

One where we craft lives of service toward each other with simple acts of grace and dignity. A meal and a warm coat. An acknowledgment of a kindness.

In the rumble of our differences, there are all manner of similarities, all manner of commonalities.

All we have to do is show up and pay attention.

We only lose if we give up.

This is the America I choose, not red or blue but a rainbow of possibility.

Read the original post on Facebook here: Facebook and Here

4 ways Blog - 12102016

Four Intentions for Making This Year – Your Best Year

We want each year to be better than the last, but some of you may feel you don’t have enough control over your outcomes. You may also feel that each year gets busier than the last; making it even harder to be mindful about your choices. Part of our Accountability Method™ asks you to focus your time and energy on things you can control, a concept Dr. Covey introduced some time ago. We ask our coaching clients to focus on four general areas: Head, Heart, Money, and Space. Then, you take a few small steps to make next year better than this one.

Number One: Head

What will you learn in the coming year? Will it be a new behavior, or a work-related field of knowledge such as rising to the next level in your financial acumen? Maybe it will be reaching an expert level on a software platform you rely on. Whether it’s financial learning or dancing Flamenco, learning something new trains your mind to be open to new possibilities in other areas of your life. People may begin to experience you as being more flexible.

Number Two: Heart

Which relationships will you invest your time and energy in at work and home? Don’t pick 3. Choose two: one at work and one at home. To whom will you bring deeper attention? How will you demonstrate this attention? Will it be through acts of kindness or more intense listening? Will it be forgiving someone? What will you do so this other person will notice and appreciate your new investment in the relationship?

Number Three: Space

What clutter will you reduce? A clear space encourages a clear mind. Most people vow to ‘clean out my desk’ or ‘purge my storage room’ or some other BIG project. We encourage busy people to start small and realistically. Consider purging just one drawer in your desk, or one shelf in your closet. Consider making one small purge each week. For those of you who are already mindful about physical space, consider what negative thought patterns you could purge next year.

Number Four: Money

What will you do to secure your finances? Review your annual products and services subscriptions and cancel any that you no longer need (or use). Use budgeting software to track your personal expenses. You might be surprised by how much you spend eating out, or by indulging in retail therapy when feeling down. What are you income goals? What is your next step to getting a promotion and raise? What are your expense goals? We recommend having a personal cash flow plan, in the same way a business does.

Finally, although some things will remain totally out of your control or influence, if you focus your energy on incremental, achievable steps, you will find yourself more self-actualized, and that means each year you’ll get closer to living the life you want to live.

Our Dynamic Results team wishes that this coming year will be your best year.

Please continue reading for additional resources to help you in creating your best year.

Head: Watch TED talks to see what types of innovation are happening in the world.

http://www.ted.com/

Heart: Learn to create what we call ‘Emotional Safety’ in your relationships.

http://dynamicresults.com/step-moments-matter-director-emotional-safety/

Space: Reduce clutter in your life and ‘free your mind’.

http://idreamofclean.net/10-foolproof-ways-to-reduce-clutter/

Money: Take small steps to improve your financial strength.

http://www.businessinsider.com/24-ways-to-improve-your-finances-this-year-2016-1

BLOG - Three Rules

Three Rules for Choosing the Right Employee (or Boss) and How to Be One of Them

Hi, I’m Henry Evans, Founding Partner of Dynamic Results.

Do you find in working with your teams that sometimes either your business results or relationships suffer?

Recently I was talking with a high-performing leader of a global pharmaceutical company. Like many of our best leaders, he delivers above his annual targets and, as importantly, he has very high employee engagement and retention. Everyone wants what he has achieved: exceeding expected business results while at the same time, building and maintaining a happy work team. To state this another way: they are doing great work, in an environment that feels great to work in.

When asked how he’s doing it, he said it boils down to knowing how to select the right people. After “many years of doing it wrong” he learned three things needed to measure when hiring, (or choosing the people you want to work for):

  • They are good at what they do. Competence should be a baseline requirement for your hires.
  • They love what they do. They aren’t dragging themselves to work. They are happy to be doing what they do, and they know the higher purpose behind their work. In this case, it’s the creation of drugs intended to improve the lives of cancer patients. If your job is manufacturing car parts, your higher purpose might be “keeping people safe while they drive”.
  • They are easy to work with. These are the people you want to be in meetings with; people you feel motivated to communicate with.
  • His experience shows that if you are missing any of these three criteria, results and/or relationships will suffer. His theory matches our own experience in coaching leaders.
    Most work conflicts or unrest that we observe are due to perceptions that people are: Incompetent (not good at what they do); Dispassionate (a buzzkill, party pooper, or energy vampire); or just plain Difficult (labeled as rude, jerks, etc.).

    In hiring, here are sample questions you may want to ask:

  • To establish Competence, ask scenario-based questions like “Please tell me about a time you had to solve a complex problem” (One relating to their job description).
  • For Passion, ask a question as simple as “Why do you do this kind of work?” or “Why did you choose this career?”
  • For Likability, ask: “Please tell me about the last three disagreements you had at work?” or “What is a personal trait people consistently tell you needs improvement?” or “What’s more important to you, relationships or results?”

    Whatever you ask and whatever you are measuring, please remember to tune-in to your intuition when making hiring decisions, or when choosing who to work for. Einstein said that “the best decisions are a combination of intellect and intuition”. He was a relatively smart guy so let’s listen to him.

    Collect whatever background data you need (work history, GPA, etc.), and check-in with yourself to see how you will feel working with this person. The best decisions are made when we use a combination of head and heart.

    I thank you for your attention.

  • Values Prison Time

    VALUES: Would you go to jail for yours?

    Hi, I’m Henry Evans, Founding Partner of Dynamic Results. We help organizations decide on strategies, and most importantly, facilitate the execution of these strategies. Our two-year process begins with helping the people in an organization to ‘get real’ about their values.

    In this video, we’ll give you some high-level insight on how we do this in what are sometimes very difficult and challenging team discussions. You might be thinking “Our organization has discussed values, and the discussion was easy. Now we’re all aligned”. If you are thinking this way, we encourage you to consider the possibility that you may not have had a deep, fully-transparent dialogue.

    We worked with one executive team where the average tenure was more than 20 years. This team of 12 was convinced they knew each other well and felt they were deeply aligned . . . until they participated in our process. After a strenuous seven-hour discussion, three of the twelve decided to take early retirement and the other 9 felt relief, knowing that those spots would be filled by people with deeper value alignment.

    Now, how do you define your “values”? We ask our clients to think of their values as so important that if any of their values became illegal, they would act on them regardless.

    For example: if the government decreed that loving your family is now a crime, would it stop you from loving them? Probably not.

    What about telling the truth? If it became illegal to tell the truth, would you still do it? Would you be willing to go to jail over it? Would you fight for your right to be truthful? If your answer is “yes”, truth is something you really value.

    For me, two of my core values are justice and transparency. If I see injustice or if I feel I’m being lied to, I’m willing to escalate and take bold action. Action could mean social protest, or even a willingness to fight. It might involve working for an organization that values justice, equality, and telling the truth, and avoiding working for one that didn’t.

    Now, ask yourself: What really drives me both at work and in life. What are the conditions and behaviors I require to be willing to work in an organization? What would make me leave?

    Some people might say “work ethic” or “comfortable corporate culture”. Others value “focus on results and profit”. We’re not suggesting we know what you should hold as your most important values. However, we are suggesting that you can predict how your relationships and business results will shake out if you understand how well (or poorly) your personal values are aligned with the organization you bring your talents to.

    Once a team becomes clear about shared values, they have a competitive advantage over teams that do not.

    In high performing organizations, teams know that values are more than slogans. Values drive more tangible results and they drive the way the business runs. A few examples:

    Which clients you choose to work for?
    • Whom do you hire?
    • How do you engage in conflict?
    • What is measured in a performance review?

    . . . and many others

    In short, get real about what you value, and do your best to work for an organization that shares these same values. Having that alignment, you will feel better about both yourself and the organization. The organization will benefit greatly as you continue to bring your “A” game to the table, ultimately producing better relationships and results.

    Thank you, we look forward to hearing your thoughts. Let us know how you are doing.

    As always, we appreciate your attention, and for additional ideas, follow me on twitter: @HenryJEvans

    Like us on Facebook to share your experiences, or email us at moreinfo@dynamicresults.com.

    Thank you.

    BLOG - Reversing Polarity image

    Reversing the Polarity of Communications for Better Business Results

    We believe that you drive results through accountability by investing in the right people, at the right times.

    Who are the 5 to 7 most important people in your work life?

    Who are the people who have the most impact on you in your career?

    These may not be the people who you LIKE the most, so ask yourself: Who are the 5 to 7 people that you have to rely on most?

    We have been presenting research to our clients globally which proves we are busier now than humans have ever been in the history of the workplace. There is increase in emails, meetings and other demands on our time; you, like most of us, are probably feeling the effects of how busy we have become. When we feel this way, we are often looking for ways to be more efficient and do things faster in an effort to “get it all done.”

    At Dynamic Results, we think you cannot get it all done and that you have to learn to prioritize differently, choosing those things that are truly most important.

    We think you have to focus on relationships. We find that they can be the first things to get put on the back-burner when we are very busy. That is something we cannot afford to do, particularly with the people who are most important to us.

    Everyone wants more accountability in their workplace, and not everyone invests in the right relationships to make accountability real.

    Here is what we mean.

    With our relationships, we try to communicate primarily through email. We know it is a very fast way to communicate, but, is it the BEST way? We think it might not be.

    The better you become at getting reflection on the front end of project planning, the better results you will see during the course of the project.

    When we get busy, we chose email or text as the fastest way to communicate, and if we have to, we pick up the phone. If we REALLY have to, we might video conference to speak with someone so we can get some sense of inflection and body language. As a last resort, we will carve out time to see them in person.
    We recommend reversing the polarity of these communications with the people who matter most to you.

    • Go and see the people who are most important to you first. Face to face.
    • If you can’t do that, communicate with them by video conference so you can still see each other face to face.
    • If that isn’t an option, pick up the phone and speak to them.
    • And, as a last resort, contact them via email or text.

    We think you cannot easily build relationships with email and text, but you can easily damage them. When you communicate via email and text, your message is received by the person reading it through the filter of how they are feeling when they receive it, NOT by how you were feeling when you sent it. You take a big risk when sending important information.

    In our best-selling book, “Winning With Accountability, the Secret Language of High Performing Organizations”, we offer frameworks for building accountability in the workplace and more about getting reflection and clearly communicating with your teams.

    We suggest you take a few moments and write down the names of the 5 to 7 people who are most important to you and begin to reverse the polarity of your communications with those people.

    • See Them in Person
    • Video Conference
    • Phone
    • Email/Text

    Thank you, we look forward to hearing your thoughts. Let us know how you are doing.

    As always, we appreciate your attention, and for additional ideas, follow me on twitter: @HenryJEvans

    Like us on Facebook to share your experiences, or email us at moreinfo@dynamicresults.com.

    Thank you.

    BLOG Reflection

    Reflection: Creating Accountability With Emotional Intelligence

    This video is about one aspect of our Accountability Method we call Reflection. When trying to convey an idea, reflection is a technique for getting back a comment about how your audience understood your message.

    Effective communication is measured by what people heard and remember, and not by what you think you said. People always act on their understanding of a message. So, reflection gives you a window into what they are actually taking away.

    Here are a few ways of getting reflection:

    We feel this first one, although direct, is a little demeaning, particularly to smart and capable people.

    • Ask something like, “What did I just say?”

    Did you feel a little insulted by that question? I felt a little insulting by asking it.

    This second question has a much greater basis in emotional intelligence. It shows vulnerability by raising the possibility that I didn’t convey my idea very clearly in the first place.

    “I know what I meant to say just now, but what exactly did you hear?”

    Vulnerability according to The Table Group, is a conduit to trust; and trust is the foundation of all successful relationships. We like this way of checking-in far better than the first one.

    Here’s a still better emotionally intelligent way for getting reflection:

    “You know we discussed a lot of things during this meeting, but what are the action items we’re taking away today? What are we going to do as a result of what was said?”

    The better you become at getting reflection on the front end of project planning, the better results you will see during the course of the project.

    As always, we’re here to offer you quick, concise ways to improve your business, your communications, and your results.

    To see our book and how people like New York Times best-selling author Marshall Goldsmith have responded to it, please click on this link: Dynamic Results Book Page.

    Thank you for your attention, and we hope to see you soon.

    Thank you, we look forward to hearing your thoughts. Let us know how you are doing.

    As always, we appreciate your attention, and for additional ideas, follow me on twitter: @HenryJEvans

    Like us on Facebook to share your experiences, or email us at moreinfo@dynamicresults.com.

    Thank you.

    ManageYourEmotions

    Managing Your Emotions

    In our Amazon Top-10 Business book, Step Up–Lead in Six Moments That Matter, we have a chapter called Get Angry, Not Stupid and we also have a previous blog with the same name. The idea is that it’s okay to feel and express feelings like anger or frustration, even at work, as long as you can express those emotions in an intelligent and productive way; one that you will feel proud of later.

    Most of you are familiar with the famous Amygdala Hijack. This is when a primal part of your brain senses or perceives danger, and, as a reaction, takes blood out of your pre-frontal lobe (where intelligent thought occurs) and pushes blood into your arms and legs so you can fight or take flight.

    Some of the foundational work we do with leaders is coaching them to manage their emotions when they are feeling hijacked. How do we remain intelligent and objective, when facing challenging situations and/or people? It’s not always easy but it gets easier with focused practice. The feelings you experience are joined by physiological changes in your body. Afflictive emotions might make your chest tight, your breathing shallow, your hands clench into fists, your shoulders tense, or your jaw tighten. In other words, your body always gives you a heads-up that you are about to realize a feeling. When you sense that, you are getting hijacked by your amygdala. Here are two of the four techniques we offer in our book that can help you stay intelligent. (If you have the book, you will find the details starting on page 24):

    Breathing. Deep, controlled breaths help restore blood back into the neo-cortex and stop the production of the chemicals that cause you to react suddenly and with great force. Sometimes it’s hard to take a deep breath when upset. In those moments, try breathing out. Do it now. Breathe all the air out through your mouth and you will notice that you cannot help but take a deep breath in.
    Breathing out through your mouth may work well while sitting alone but may not work quite as well when sitting at a meeting or a dinner table surrounded with people looking at you. So, try an alternative for those situations. Slowly push the air out of your lungs through your nose. Again, you will notice that you can’t help but breathe in afterwards. Really, try it now. I promise you will have more oxygen available to you after you breathe out.

    Questioning. When you ask your brain a question — any question — it forces blood back into the neo-cortex where intelligent thought occurs. So when you are triggered, ask yourself a question. Start with simple questions. What did I eat for breakfast yesterday? What is the last good movie I saw? What time did I wake up yesterday?
    While any question will produce the desired result of a calmer emotional state and more rational thinking; as you progress in this practice, you can ask more sophisticated questions that are appropriate to the situation at hand. What can I say to make this person feel safe right now? What am I really trying to accomplish in this situation? What can I say or do to build this relationship?

    Managing your emotions in the moment is not always easy. It requires practicing these techniques when you’re not being hijacked, so that they are readily available to you when you are.
    Remember that your body will give you a heads-up. If you are aware of what is happening in your body, you can interrupt the cycle, stay at the stage in which you are simply irritated, and not let your emotions get out of hand.

    Thank you, we look forward to hearing your thoughts. Let us know how you are doing.

    As always, we appreciate your attention, and for additional ideas, follow me on twitter: @HenryJEvans

    Like us on Facebook to share your experiences, or email us at moreinfo@dynamicresults.com.

    Thank you.

    Eradicate Excuses Image

    Eradicate Excuses in the Workplace in Three Easy Steps

    What’s Your Excuse?

    What are the three excuses you use most often?

    With more than 10,000 hours of executive coaching experience, my observation is that everyone, even the highest performing people use excuses when they miss a deadline or break a promise. When we offer excuses to others, we lose credibility and trust.

    The first step to Eradicate Excuses in the Workplace™ is to shift our focus from the easy work of noticing when other people are giving excuses, to the harder and more impactful work of noticing when we do it ourselves.

    Here are some of my excuses:

    • I was on travel
    • Yesterday was too busy

    These are not explanations; they are excuses; (explanations are okay).

    In fact, being on travel and having a busy day doesn’t change the fact that I had the exact same amount of time as every other person on the planet, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

    We do a deep dive on this in our Accountability Trainings and while we can’t cover our entire method in a two-minute video, we can give you the basics.

    We invite you to Eradicate Excuses in the Workplace™ by following three easy steps.

    Identify the excuse. One example is my personal favorite: “I was on travel”
    Replace the excuse with an explanation like “I didn’t make it a priority”
    State your call to action: “Here is when I will do it,” which is why this person came to speak with you in the first place.

    They want to know what you WILL do, not WHY you didn’t do it.

    When I said “I was on travel”, a more accountable replacement would have been “I’m sorry I didn’t keep the commitment. I was on travel and didn’t make it a priority. You will see the report in Excel format by 3pm PT, tomorrow, January 10″.

    Now, how do you start eradicating your own excuses?

    Start by writing down the three excuses you use most often. Then, add some more accountable language to replace those excuses.

    Feel free to call your own excuses out in the moment. If you catch yourself saying something like “I was on travel”, say, “You know what, that’s an excuse. I didn’t make it a priority yesterday and I will tomorrow. Expect to see the report in your inbox by 10:00 am, CT tomorrow”.

    Use this video in a team meeting to identify the excuses you use most often as individuals and as a team.

    Make operating agreements to replace that language with clear explanations, followed immediately by a firm and specific call to action.

    In upcoming months, we will be talking about other aspects of Eradicating Excuses in the Workplace™ like:

    • Understanding the difference between an explanation and an excuse.

    Thank you, we look forward to hearing your thoughts. Let us know how you are doing.

    As always, we appreciate your attention, and for additional ideas, follow me on twitter: @HenryJEvans

    Like us on Facebook to share your experiences, or email us at moreinfo@dynamicresults.com.

    Thank you.

    Prioritization Filter

    Prioritization Filter – How to get real about your ‘to do’ list

    Over the years, I’ve amassed more than 10,000 hours of coaching CEO’s and others in the c-suite. During that time, I’ve learned and also developed practices to make high performing leaders, perform at even higher levels.

    Today, we’re sharing a process we published in our Amazon Top Ten Business book, Step Up, Lead in Six Moments that Matter, called The Prioritization Filter (pg. 78).

    You have a to-do list. If you are like the rest of humanity, you don’t do everything on that list, even if you intend to. When we coach others, part of that effort is in helping people realize what is realistic. For this conversation, it is about putting your “to-do” list into three categories.

    Execution: Own it. You have already, or you will immediately assign the resources required to get this done yourself. The resources we’re talking about are generally your time and the organizations money. Another way of viewing this is your, “I will do it” category.

    Delegation: You will ask someone else to align their time and effort to accomplishing the task. You’re not doing the actual work yourself, and you are being thoughtful enough to recruit or assign someone else so that the work is completed. Think of this as the, “I’ll find someone else to do this” category.

    Finally, we have the category most people are missing, even if they are otherwise high performing. We call this Elimination: Get honest with yourself and decide, or in some cases admit to yourself, that you won’t be doing this. For example, if tasks you’ve been meaning to complete for a long time, show evidence that you won’t do them, why not throw them out and acknowledge that? If that decision makes you nervous, you must assign resources through one of the previous categories, execution, or delegation. Otherwise, call this category, “I won’t do this“. Sometimes, this involves calling people and having a tough conversation where you renegotiate your original commitment.

    Prioritization Filter Branded

    (Click Image for detail)

    Taken from page 78 of our Amazon Top 10, Best-Selling Book; ‘Step Up, Lead In Six Moments That Matter

    If you use this tool to sort your “to-do” list, once a week, you will notice yourself doing what is most important and you will travel home feeling like what you didn’t get done, was less important that what you did get done.

    Our intention is, that by watching this video, you have learned how to apply this practice. If you would like a downloadable image of the Prioritization Filter and/or a deeper explanation, you will find both in our book, on and leading up to page 78.

    As always, we appreciate your attention, and for additional ideas, follow me on twitter: @HenryJEvans

    Like us on Facebook to share your experiences, or email us at moreinfo@dynamicresults.com.

    Thank you.