BLOG Reflection

Reflection: Creating Accountability With Emotional Intelligence

This video is about one aspect of our Accountability Method we call Reflection. When trying to convey an idea, reflection is a technique for getting back a comment about how your audience understood your message.

Effective communication is measured by what people heard and remember, and not by what you think you said. People always act on their understanding of a message. So, reflection gives you a window into what they are actually taking away.

Here are a few ways of getting reflection:

We feel this first one, although direct, is a little demeaning, particularly to smart and capable people.

• Ask something like, “What did I just say?”

Did you feel a little insulted by that question? I felt a little insulting by asking it.

This second question has a much greater basis in emotional intelligence. It shows vulnerability by raising the possibility that I didn’t convey my idea very clearly in the first place.

“I know what I meant to say just now, but what exactly did you hear?”

Vulnerability according to The Table Group, is a conduit to trust; and trust is the foundation of all successful relationships. We like this way of checking-in far better than the first one.

Here’s a still better emotionally intelligent way for getting reflection:

“You know we discussed a lot of things during this meeting, but what are the action items we’re taking away today? What are we going to do as a result of what was said?”

The better you become at getting reflection on the front end of project planning, the better results you will see during the course of the project.

As always, we’re here to offer you quick, concise ways to improve your business, your communications, and your results.

To see our book and how people like New York Times best-selling author Marshall Goldsmith have responded to it, please click on this link: Dynamic Results Book Page.

Thank you for your attention, and we hope to see you soon.

Thank you, we look forward to hearing your thoughts. Let us know how you are doing.

As always, we appreciate your attention, and for additional ideas, follow me on twitter: @HenryJEvans

Like us on Facebook to share your experiences, or email us at [email protected]

Thank you.

ManageYourEmotions

Managing Your Emotions

In our Amazon Top-10 Business book, Step Up–Lead in Six Moments That Matter, we have a chapter called Get Angry, Not Stupid and we also have a previous blog with the same name. The idea is that it’s okay to feel and express feelings like anger or frustration, even at work, as long as you can express those emotions in an intelligent and productive way; one that you will feel proud of later.

Most of you are familiar with the famous Amygdala Hijack. This is when a primal part of your brain senses or perceives danger, and, as a reaction, takes blood out of your pre-frontal lobe (where intelligent thought occurs) and pushes blood into your arms and legs so you can fight or take flight.

Some of the foundational work we do with leaders is coaching them to manage their emotions when they are feeling hijacked. How do we remain intelligent and objective, when facing challenging situations and/or people? It’s not always easy but it gets easier with focused practice. The feelings you experience are joined by physiological changes in your body. Afflictive emotions might make your chest tight, your breathing shallow, your hands clench into fists, your shoulders tense, or your jaw tighten. In other words, your body always gives you a heads-up that you are about to realize a feeling. When you sense that, you are getting hijacked by your amygdala. Here are two of the four techniques we offer in our book that can help you stay intelligent. (If you have the book, you will find the details starting on page 24):

Breathing. Deep, controlled breaths help restore blood back into the neo-cortex and stop the production of the chemicals that cause you to react suddenly and with great force. Sometimes it’s hard to take a deep breath when upset. In those moments, try breathing out. Do it now. Breathe all the air out through your mouth and you will notice that you cannot help but take a deep breath in.
Breathing out through your mouth may work well while sitting alone but may not work quite as well when sitting at a meeting or a dinner table surrounded with people looking at you. So, try an alternative for those situations. Slowly push the air out of your lungs through your nose. Again, you will notice that you can’t help but breathe in afterwards. Really, try it now. I promise you will have more oxygen available to you after you breathe out.

Questioning. When you ask your brain a question — any question — it forces blood back into the neo-cortex where intelligent thought occurs. So when you are triggered, ask yourself a question. Start with simple questions. What did I eat for breakfast yesterday? What is the last good movie I saw? What time did I wake up yesterday?
While any question will produce the desired result of a calmer emotional state and more rational thinking; as you progress in this practice, you can ask more sophisticated questions that are appropriate to the situation at hand. What can I say to make this person feel safe right now? What am I really trying to accomplish in this situation? What can I say or do to build this relationship?

Managing your emotions in the moment is not always easy. It requires practicing these techniques when you’re not being hijacked, so that they are readily available to you when you are.
Remember that your body will give you a heads-up. If you are aware of what is happening in your body, you can interrupt the cycle, stay at the stage in which you are simply irritated, and not let your emotions get out of hand.

Thank you, we look forward to hearing your thoughts. Let us know how you are doing.

As always, we appreciate your attention, and for additional ideas, follow me on twitter: @HenryJEvans

Like us on Facebook to share your experiences, or email us at [email protected]

Thank you.

Eradicate Excuses Image

Eradicate Excuses at Work in Three Easy Steps

What’s Your Excuse?

What are the three excuses you use most often?

With more than 10,000 hours of executive coaching experience, my observation is that everyone, even the highest performing people use excuses when they miss a deadline or break a promise. When we offer excuses to others, we lose credibility and trust.

The first step to Eradicate Excuses in the Workplace™ is to shift our focus from the easy work of noticing when other people are giving excuses, to the harder and more impactful work of noticing when we do it ourselves.

Here are some of my excuses:

• I was on travel
• Yesterday was too busy

These are not explanations; they are excuses; (explanations are okay).

In fact, being on travel and having a busy day doesn’t change the fact that I had the exact same amount of time as every other person on the planet, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

We do a deep dive on this in our Accountability Trainings and while we can’t cover our entire method in a two-minute video, we can give you the basics.

We invite you to Eradicate Excuses in the Workplace™ by following three easy steps.

Identify the excuse. One example is my personal favorite: “I was on travel”
Replace the excuse with an explanation like “I didn’t make it a priority”
State your call to action: “Here is when I will do it,” which is why this person came to speak with you in the first place.

They want to know what you WILL do, not WHY you didn’t do it.

When I said “I was on travel”, a more accountable replacement would have been “I’m sorry I didn’t keep the commitment. I was on travel and didn’t make it a priority. You will see the report in Excel format by 3pm PT, tomorrow, January 10″.

Now, how do you start eradicating your own excuses?

Start by writing down the three excuses you use most often. Then, add some more accountable language to replace those excuses.

Feel free to call your own excuses out in the moment. If you catch yourself saying something like “I was on travel”, say, “You know what, that’s an excuse. I didn’t make it a priority yesterday and I will tomorrow. Expect to see the report in your inbox by 10:00 am, CT tomorrow”.

Use this video in a team meeting to identify the excuses you use most often as individuals and as a team.

Make operating agreements to replace that language with clear explanations, followed immediately by a firm and specific call to action.

In upcoming months, we will be talking about other aspects of Eradicating Excuses in the Workplace™ like:

• Understanding the difference between an explanation and an excuse.

Thank you, we look forward to hearing your thoughts. Let us know how you are doing.

As always, we appreciate your attention, and for additional ideas, follow me on twitter: @HenryJEvans

Like us on Facebook to share your experiences, or email us at [email protected]

Thank you.

Prioritization Filter

Prioritization Filter – How to get real about your ‘to do’ list

Over the years, I’ve amassed more than 10,000 hours of coaching CEO’s and others in the c-suite. During that time, I’ve learned and also developed practices to make high performing leaders, perform at even higher levels.

Today, we’re sharing a process we published in our Amazon Top Ten Business book, Step Up, Lead in Six Moments that Matter, called The Prioritization Filter (pg. 78).

You have a to-do list. If you are like the rest of humanity, you don’t do everything on that list, even if you intend to. When we coach others, part of that effort is in helping people realize what is realistic. For this conversation, it is about putting your “to-do” list into three categories.

Execution: Own it. You have already, or you will immediately assign the resources required to get this done yourself. The resources we’re talking about are generally your time and the organizations money. Another way of viewing this is your, “I will do it” category.

Delegation: You will ask someone else to align their time and effort to accomplishing the task. You’re not doing the actual work yourself, and you are being thoughtful enough to recruit or assign someone else so that the work is completed. Think of this as the, “I’ll find someone else to do this” category.

Finally, we have the category most people are missing, even if they are otherwise high performing. We call this Elimination: Get honest with yourself and decide, or in some cases admit to yourself, that you won’t be doing this. For example, if tasks you’ve been meaning to complete for a long time, show evidence that you won’t do them, why not throw them out and acknowledge that? If that decision makes you nervous, you must assign resources through one of the previous categories, execution, or delegation. Otherwise, call this category, “I won’t do this“. Sometimes, this involves calling people and having a tough conversation where you renegotiate your original commitment.

Prioritization Filter Branded

(Click Image for detail)

Taken from page 78 of our Amazon Top 10, Best-Selling Book; ‘Step Up, Lead In Six Moments That Matter

If you use this tool to sort your “to-do” list, once a week, you will notice yourself doing what is most important and you will travel home feeling like what you didn’t get done, was less important that what you did get done.

Our intention is, that by watching this video, you have learned how to apply this practice. If you would like a downloadable image of the Prioritization Filter and/or a deeper explanation, you will find both in our book, on and leading up to page 78.

As always, we appreciate your attention, and for additional ideas, follow me on twitter: @HenryJEvans

Like us on Facebook to share your experiences, or email us at [email protected]

Thank you.

Decide Already

Decide Already! How to get decisions made, no matter your title.

In order to be competitive as an individual, team, or organization, you need agility and speed in this rapidly changing marketplace. This means that decisions must be made faster than your competitors, and your plans executed with excellence.

In the Amazon top-10 business book I co-authored with Dr. Colm Foster, Step Up, Lead in Six Moments That Matter, we dedicated a chapter showing how to accomplish this.

Here are two of the ways our clients are able to outpace their competitors in decision making.

First: You can bring a team to a decision with or without the formal authority to do so by “Reversing the momentum of negative interactions”.

This means that when you notice a team is stuck in discussing a problem, you say or do something to shift the energy toward finding a solution, by saying something like “I think we’ve done a great job of establishing the problem, what are we going to do about it? What’s our next step?” This type of momentum reversal is a kind of judo move that anyone can do whether CEO, new hire, or anywhere in-between.

Second: There is no such thing as a perfect plan. So please, Don’t Wait for Perfection.

As one of the keystones of our practice, we help organizations write and execute their strategies. Although every challenge is unique, we have found this constant truth: An 80 percent complete strategy brilliantly executed always beats a 100 percent finished strategy badly executed. As General George S. Patton said, “A good plan violently executed now is better than a perfect plan executed next week.”

We have worked with organizations who tend to get stuck in analysis paralysis while trying to complete a project. Sometimes a strategic-planning client wants to reassess and reevaluate their carefully thought-out initiatives rather than begin implementing them. We call this the postponed perfection syndrome.

According to Harvard research, in using our Accountability Method™, our clients implement their strategies at almost 8x the rate of most organizations. They’ve learned how to make and execute their decisions, even when outcomes are uncertain. They achieve greatness because they are willing to take action during unstable times, when their competitors would rather play it safe by talking instead of doing.

Our clients have learned that if you have 4 out of 5 data points needed to make a decision – Make That Decision! Having all five data points is not a guarantee of anything, as your changing environment and/or new data may require a change. An 80% solution is usually enough to get started.

We would rather see our clients follow a procedure we call Decide, Execute, Adjust.

1. Decide how you will begin doing something,
2. Begin doing it (get out ahead of your competitors), and
3. Stay present and aware of data telling you when and how you need to change.

Make your next step identifying a decision your team is failing to make and invite them to crystalize and begin to execute what some of your team members may still be calling “an imperfect plan”.

Say something like “I think we have enough information to proceed with a decision” or “Can we begin to execute based on the information we have and adjust as we go?”

While this type of action may not be completely comfortable for everyone on your team, it will keep you ahead of your competitors.

As always, we appreciate your attention, and for additional ideas, follow me on twitter: @HenryJEvans

Like us on Facebook to share your experiences, or email us at [email protected]

Thank you.

April 2015 Blog Video

3 Rules for Choosing Your Accountability Partner & Getting Better Business Results

Today we want to talk to you about three rules for Driving Results through Accountability Partners.

We all know the concept of an accountability partner: Someone with whom we share our commitments, knowing that they will hold us accountable and responsible for executing what we told them we would do by when we said we would do it.

Here are some pitfalls of choosing the wrong accountability partner, along with some best practices for knowing whom you should pick.

Number One: Pick someone at the peer level: You should not pick your boss, and you should not pick any of your employees. Why? If you have people who work for you, or if you are working for someone, they may (or may not) have your best interests at heart. You want your partner to be someone at your peer level or someone outside of your organization.

When people are writing your performance review, (or when you are writing someone else’s), you are very unlikely to completely ignore things they told you they are trying to accomplish; things that you know they are not succeeding at.

Example: you might be writing a performance review for someone who is doing a fairly good job at work; and has said they are also trying to lose weight, cut back on Facebook time, and also, quit smoking. Because you know they failed at those, your perception is just a little bit lower than it might otherwise have been. And you, if you are like most human beings, are going on some level to let that impact your review. That would not be fair, because he or she is being rated on business performance, not on anything outside of business.

Number Two: Choose someone who has your best interests at heart. Further, we don’t want you to choose a person you are in competition with. So let’s talk about peers. If I have a peer that I am competing with, either for resources, or a promotion, that person is not a good accountability partner. My accountability partner has to have my best interests at heart.

Number Three: Choose someone who will be assertive and has the courage to tell me when I am messing up; or to challenge me when I am falling behind on a project, so I can achieve my desired business results, on time.

Having chosen an accountability partner, the burden is now on me to make it emotionally safe to challenge me when I am not keeping my commitments (and that’s what a coach must be able to do). So whether your accountability partner is a coach whom you hire externally, or someone whom you work with as a peer, or someone outside of the organization:

• We recommend that you get a partner, and soon.
• We recommend that you proactively publish your commitments and goals to that person; and
• That you make them feel emotionally safe when they do hold you accountable.

These are just a few of the ways you can drive better business results through using accountability partners.

Thank you for your continued interest, and we look forward to bringing you additional insights from our experts in future blogs.

If you want to learn more about Stepping Up, contact us.

As always, we welcome your comments. Join us on Facebook to share your experiences, or email us at [email protected]

Steps To Taking A Real Vacation

Six Steps For Taking A Real Vacation

by Dynamic Results

Steps To Taking A Real VacationDo you have trouble disconnecting from the office while on vacation? If so, you are not alone. Business Week reports that over 76 percent of executives said they work at least a few times a week, and 33 percent said they conduct business every single day.

Is this healthy?

The American Institute of Stress reports, “Increased levels of job stress have been demonstrated to be associated with increased rates of heart attack, hypertension and other disorders.”

Is this productive?

As executive coaches, we see the effects of prolonged stress on our clients every day: reduced focus, lack of energy, loss of enthusiasm and creativity; with increased negative interactions with team members. The Families and Work Institute found that overworked individuals are more likely to make mistakes.

So, our big question is: Is it really necessary to always take the office with you?

It is, if you haven’t done sufficient planning. Like everything else in business and life – insufficient planning leads to poor results.

One client, the President of an International Manufacturing company, candidly shares what so many others suffer through. “I normally practice the Robin Williams concept from the movie RV; I do my work when the family is asleep.”

Our Dynamic Results team is committed to demonstrating accountability; which goes way beyond getting things done on time. Being accountable includes taking good care of yourself and living life in a way that is nurturing for you and inspiring to the people with whom you live and work.

Here are a few tips to help boost your accountability for taking healthy and refreshing vacations:

  • A few weeks before leaving, review the status of your key projects. Decide what you will complete before leaving and what and to whom you will delegate remaining tasks.
  • Consult with all your team members and communicate to each one what you want them to handle while you’re away. Make sure to have them state their understanding of what you require to guard against mixed signals or other miscommunications.
  • Notify everyone concerned in your projects who will be responsible while you’re away; how to reach them, and when you’ll return.
  • Set your voice mail and email accounts to inform everyone you are out of the office on vacation.
  • Leave the day before and the day after your trip unscheduled. This will allow you to leave with confidence knowing that you have not only a manageable situation to return to, but time do deal with any unforeseen problems when you get back.
  • Most importantly – commit to letting go and not checking your email and voice mail while away.
  • Finally, make yourself accountable to your spouse and family by showing them this article.

One client, a SVP at a Global Manufacturing company advises that to develop strong, independent thinkers and doers, letting go while away gives all concerned the opportunity to rise to the next level.

Henry Evans, Managing Partner of Dynamic Results, shares, “I leave my computer behind. I do carry a cell phone in case of emergency, but usually leave it turned off and packed away. My objective is to focus on recharging and rejuvenating for a happier and more productive Henry when I return.”

As always, we welcome your comments. Join us on facebook to share your experiences or email us at [email protected].

Learn how to build a culture of accountability at your organization.

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Corporate Leadership Expert Henry Evans

Keynote Highlights: Accountability as a Competitive Advantage: Driving Results Without Being a Jerk


We have teamed up with BrightSite Group to promote Henry Evans, our Managing Partner and author of “Winning With Accountability, The Secret Language of High Performing Organizations” on the keynote circuit. Please click on the link above for our promotional video.

With the global success of our best-selling book “Winning With Accountability, The Secret Language of High Performing Organizations” (now with over 100,000 copies in print) we are changing the way teams all over the world are defining Accountability.

We have a team of certified trainers across the globe who are ready to bring the method to your teams. Our Director of Operations, Ede Ericson, is available to speak to you about Accountability or any of our Core Competencies. Please contact her anytime: [email protected] or 214-742-1403 x 106

Thank you again for your continued support of what we do!