Lemonade

4 Steps To Making Lemonade Out Of Losses

As a former competitive martial artist, I learned at an early age that sometimes, despite all of your training and preparation, losing will happen.

In our business, we help teams formulate and execute strategies designed to give them a competitive advantage. While on that journey, our clients sometimes make mistakes, or, as in athletic competition, they experience losses.

How does this apply to your team?

Though you and your team may train properly, and create a winning game plan, sometimes, even when executed properly, you will still lose. Unforeseen obstacles, unanticipated variables, or even plain bad luck will prevent you from achieving your desired outcome.

As a martial artist, my coaches taught me a mantra that we often teach our clients. A loss is not a failure if you learn from it. In this context, a loss is a lesson. With this in mind, let’s discuss how a team failure can become part of achieving better business results.

Plan for failure. As part of your planning process, accept the reality that not everything you try will work out the way you intended. Use a mantra like ‘fail fast and fail cheap’.

Reward what we call ‘new and innovative mistakes’. Wow us, show us a flaw in our process that no one had anticipated. However, if a team or individual is making redundant mistakes we still want them to have a job, we just want them to have it with a competitor.

Celebrate your ‘failures’. Each time you record a ‘failure’ you have harvested and identified something that you should stop doing or do differently. Celebrate these milestones as part of your continuous improvement process. Create an environment of Emotional Safety™ for those times when your people do make mistakes.

Learn from the mistake. As a result of what you learned, what will you and your team begin to say, do, or think about differently? What is a process improvement that you will make? Bottom line: Make a process improvement.

Some teams we’ve worked with go so far as to award and incentivize strategic losses. You can give awards such as ‘Most Innovative Attempt to Succeed’ or ‘New Lesson Engineering Award’.

We teach our strategy clients that the two keys to being more competitive are 1) Be faster than your competitor to recognize the need for change; and 2) Make that change faster than your competitor. If we were to add a third, it would be to learn from mistakes faster than your competitor.

To summarize: any person or organization that wants to drive innovation, must make the acceptance of failure an acceptable part of the culture. To put this another way: Start thinking about new and innovative failures as lessons.

Losses and mistakes are not failures when they are generated; they are made into failures when you refuse to learn from them or make improvements as a result of them.

BLOG Emotional Safety

Emotional Safety™: The Key to Making Smart Decisions

Informed people make the best decisions, and, as a result, add the most value to their organizations.

Whatever job you have and whatever your level of authority, your people are relying on you to be informed about your function, no matter whether you’re CEO or packing and shipping on the warehouse floor. No matter where you sit or what you do, other people count on you to know your stuff.

In short: Your co-workers want you to be an expert; but what makes an ‘expert’? An expert may have earned that reputation through a combination of training, study, work experience, observation, or ongoing learning.

We suggest that part of being and remaining an expert is linked to being fully informed about your role; meaning that your knowledge goes beyond the day-to-day responsibilities of your job. It means you know where your work comes from, why your work exists, and that you understand the needs of your stakeholders. In addition, it means knowing how others see you as an employee, boss, vendor, or co-worker.

This is where our concept of ‘Emotional Safety™‘ becomes important. Most people find it easy to approach you to share good news about your performance or behavior. They also find it easy to tell you when you’ve done something well. But what about the times when things aren’t going so well? What if someone wants to give you constructive criticism? We suggest that the easier and more rewarding you make it to bring you ‘bad’ news, the more informed you will be.

Simply put: Emotional Safety™ means you make others feel comfortable in bringing you bad or challenging news. If you master Emotional Safety™, you will be going beyond making them comfortable in approaching you, and actually make them feel rewarded and appreciated for doing so.

So, when someone points out a problem with your plan, thank them. When someone suggests that you behaved badly during an interaction, thank them; and, when someone challenges your opinion, acknowledge their thoughts and thank them.

For stronger relationships, dealing with feelings before facts will get you deeper, more rewarding and more productive relationships. It will also promote better business results.

One of my colleagues, Dr. Tim Turner, ran the Emotional Intelligence Development program for the FBI. Early in his career as an agent, Tim noticed that the agents who solved the most cases were not the tough guys you see in the movies. Instead, they had a way of making others feel comfortable. Even when interrogating a suspect, the agents created an experience of Emotional Safety™ for that person.

So how can you bring this about in your work? By collecting as much data as you can (even the stuff you don’t like hearing about) so you can make fully-informed decisions.

Think about it this way, just because people aren’t telling you how you can improve, doesn’t mean you don’t need to improve, because we all do. It is more likely to mean that they’ve had an unrewarding experience with you, and, as a result, they’ve started to withhold information from you. If too many people do that, you’ll still have the same decision-making authority; but you’ll be deciding in an uninformed way, making you dangerous to your organization.

For more on Emotional Safety™, read our Amazon top-10 business book, “Step Up–Lead in Six Moments that Matter“, co-authored by Henry Evans and Colm Foster. The last chapter is focused on creating Emotional Safety™ for everyone, which will foster better business results.

Mastering Empathy Blog

Mastering Empathy in 3 Easy Steps: Building Better Relationships and Business Results through Managing Conflict

Let’s see if we can sharpen your empathy skills in 4 minutes or less.

Empathy, simply put, is expressing your understanding of how another person feels, leaving them feeling understood and heard. This is easy to do when you share their concern or care about their issue. It’s not so easy when you don’t care.

Has someone ever told you about a problem or brought you a complaint that mattered a lot to them and didn’t matter to you at all?

Perhaps you found yourself thinking “this isn’t a real problem” or “I can’t believe they are worried about something like this”.

Perhaps you don’t care about their opinion because their facts are completely wrong. Let’s roll with that example.

Suppose you and I work together and you don’t like working with me. This dislike has built up to a point where you are going to tell me about it. You say “Henry, I don’t like working with you because your hair is too long and I feel like you are always brushing it during our meetings.”

These facts are obviously wrong and if I had to go to court to argue against them, it wouldn’t take me long to persuade the jury and win the case. But what happens to our relationship if focusing on the facts is all I do? If your frustration energy was high when our interaction started, and all I do is argue the facts, it will most likely increase your negative charge, leave you even more frustrated, and permanently damage our relationship. So, how to fix this?

STEP ONE: Put their feelings before their facts. Try to remember a time when you didn’t want to work with someone and remember how that felt. Do that right now. You are probably naming feelings like “frustrating”, “unmotivating” or even “de-energizing”. If you can remember your feelings, you are halfway to creating a meaningful human connection with this person. Now all you have to do is express your understanding by saying something like:

“It sounds like working with me feels frustrating and you really don’t want to do it anymore. I too have felt the same way about a co-worker, and I don’t want you to have that experience with me.”

• Now, for STEP TWO: check in with the person to see if they now feel understood.

If they nod, or say “Yes, that’s what I meant”, they are feeling de-energized, more objective, and relieved that you understand them. Now you’re both ready to discuss the facts.

STEP THREE: When approaching the facts do what we call “using curiosity in lieu of judgement”. Instead of saying “You’re wrong because look, I’m bald” say “What led you to the opinion you just presented to me? I want to hear more about your perspective.” If your relationship is strong enough for some humor, you might ask “Really? Tell me, what color is my hair?”

For stronger relationships, dealing with feelings before facts will get you deeper, more rewarding and more productive relationships. It will also promote better business results.

4 ways Blog - 12102016

Four Intentions for Making This Year – Your Best Year

We want each year to be better than the last, but some of you may feel you don’t have enough control over your outcomes. You may also feel that each year gets busier than the last; making it even harder to be mindful about your choices. Part of our Accountability Method™ asks you to focus your time and energy on things you can control, a concept Dr. Covey introduced some time ago. We ask our coaching clients to focus on four general areas: Head, Heart, Money, and Space. Then, you take a few small steps to make next year better than this one.

Number One: Head

What will you learn in the coming year? Will it be a new behavior, or a work-related field of knowledge such as rising to the next level in your financial acumen? Maybe it will be reaching an expert level on a software platform you rely on. Whether it’s financial learning or dancing Flamenco, learning something new trains your mind to be open to new possibilities in other areas of your life. People may begin to experience you as being more flexible.

Number Two: Heart

Which relationships will you invest your time and energy in at work and home? Don’t pick 3. Choose two: one at work and one at home. To whom will you bring deeper attention? How will you demonstrate this attention? Will it be through acts of kindness or more intense listening? Will it be forgiving someone? What will you do so this other person will notice and appreciate your new investment in the relationship?

Number Three: Space

What clutter will you reduce? A clear space encourages a clear mind. Most people vow to ‘clean out my desk’ or ‘purge my storage room’ or some other BIG project. We encourage busy people to start small and realistically. Consider purging just one drawer in your desk, or one shelf in your closet. Consider making one small purge each week. For those of you who are already mindful about physical space, consider what negative thought patterns you could purge next year.

Number Four: Money

What will you do to secure your finances? Review your annual products and services subscriptions and cancel any that you no longer need (or use). Use budgeting software to track your personal expenses. You might be surprised by how much you spend eating out, or by indulging in retail therapy when feeling down. What are you income goals? What is your next step to getting a promotion and raise? What are your expense goals? We recommend having a personal cash flow plan, in the same way a business does.

Finally, although some things will remain totally out of your control or influence, if you focus your energy on incremental, achievable steps, you will find yourself more self-actualized, and that means each year you’ll get closer to living the life you want to live.

Our Dynamic Results team wishes that this coming year will be your best year.

Please continue reading for additional resources to help you in creating your best year.

Head: Watch TED talks to see what types of innovation are happening in the world.

http://www.ted.com/

Heart: Learn to create what we call ‘Emotional Safety’ in your relationships.

http://dynamicresults.com/step-moments-matter-director-emotional-safety/

Space: Reduce clutter in your life and ‘free your mind’.

http://idreamofclean.net/10-foolproof-ways-to-reduce-clutter/

Money: Take small steps to improve your financial strength.

http://www.businessinsider.com/24-ways-to-improve-your-finances-this-year-2016-1

BLOG - Three Rules

Three Rules for Choosing the Right Employee (or Boss) and How to Be One of Them

Hi, I’m Henry Evans, Founding Partner of Dynamic Results.

Do you find in working with your teams that sometimes either your business results or relationships suffer?

Recently I was talking with a high-performing leader of a global pharmaceutical company. Like many of our best leaders, he delivers above his annual targets and, as importantly, he has very high employee engagement and retention. Everyone wants what he has achieved: exceeding expected business results while at the same time, building and maintaining a happy work team. To state this another way: they are doing great work, in an environment that feels great to work in.

When asked how he’s doing it, he said it boils down to knowing how to select the right people. After “many years of doing it wrong” he learned three things needed to measure when hiring, (or choosing the people you want to work for):

  • They are good at what they do. Competence should be a baseline requirement for your hires.
  • They love what they do. They aren’t dragging themselves to work. They are happy to be doing what they do, and they know the higher purpose behind their work. In this case, it’s the creation of drugs intended to improve the lives of cancer patients. If your job is manufacturing car parts, your higher purpose might be “keeping people safe while they drive”.
  • They are easy to work with. These are the people you want to be in meetings with; people you feel motivated to communicate with.
  • His experience shows that if you are missing any of these three criteria, results and/or relationships will suffer. His theory matches our own experience in coaching leaders.
    Most work conflicts or unrest that we observe are due to perceptions that people are: Incompetent (not good at what they do); Dispassionate (a buzzkill, party pooper, or energy vampire); or just plain Difficult (labeled as rude, jerks, etc.).

    In hiring, here are sample questions you may want to ask:

  • To establish Competence, ask scenario-based questions like “Please tell me about a time you had to solve a complex problem” (One relating to their job description).
  • For Passion, ask a question as simple as “Why do you do this kind of work?” or “Why did you choose this career?”
  • For Likability, ask: “Please tell me about the last three disagreements you had at work?” or “What is a personal trait people consistently tell you needs improvement?” or “What’s more important to you, relationships or results?”

    Whatever you ask and whatever you are measuring, please remember to tune-in to your intuition when making hiring decisions, or when choosing who to work for. Einstein said that “the best decisions are a combination of intellect and intuition”. He was a relatively smart guy so let’s listen to him.

    Collect whatever background data you need (work history, GPA, etc.), and check-in with yourself to see how you will feel working with this person. The best decisions are made when we use a combination of head and heart.

    I thank you for your attention.

  • Values Prison Time

    VALUES: Would you go to jail for yours?

    Hi, I’m Henry Evans, Founding Partner of Dynamic Results. We help organizations decide on strategies, and most importantly, facilitate the execution of these strategies. Our two-year process begins with helping the people in an organization to ‘get real’ about their values.

    In this video, we’ll give you some high-level insight on how we do this in what are sometimes very difficult and challenging team discussions. You might be thinking “Our organization has discussed values, and the discussion was easy. Now we’re all aligned”. If you are thinking this way, we encourage you to consider the possibility that you may not have had a deep, fully-transparent dialogue.

    We worked with one executive team where the average tenure was more than 20 years. This team of 12 was convinced they knew each other well and felt they were deeply aligned . . . until they participated in our process. After a strenuous seven-hour discussion, three of the twelve decided to take early retirement and the other 9 felt relief, knowing that those spots would be filled by people with deeper value alignment.

    Now, how do you define your “values”? We ask our clients to think of their values as so important that if any of their values became illegal, they would act on them regardless.

    For example: if the government decreed that loving your family is now a crime, would it stop you from loving them? Probably not.

    What about telling the truth? If it became illegal to tell the truth, would you still do it? Would you be willing to go to jail over it? Would you fight for your right to be truthful? If your answer is “yes”, truth is something you really value.

    For me, two of my core values are justice and transparency. If I see injustice or if I feel I’m being lied to, I’m willing to escalate and take bold action. Action could mean social protest, or even a willingness to fight. It might involve working for an organization that values justice, equality, and telling the truth, and avoiding working for one that didn’t.

    Now, ask yourself: What really drives me both at work and in life. What are the conditions and behaviors I require to be willing to work in an organization? What would make me leave?

    Some people might say “work ethic” or “comfortable corporate culture”. Others value “focus on results and profit”. We’re not suggesting we know what you should hold as your most important values. However, we are suggesting that you can predict how your relationships and business results will shake out if you understand how well (or poorly) your personal values are aligned with the organization you bring your talents to.

    Once a team becomes clear about shared values, they have a competitive advantage over teams that do not.

    In high performing organizations, teams know that values are more than slogans. Values drive more tangible results and they drive the way the business runs. A few examples:

    Which clients you choose to work for?
    • Whom do you hire?
    • How do you engage in conflict?
    • What is measured in a performance review?

    . . . and many others

    In short, get real about what you value, and do your best to work for an organization that shares these same values. Having that alignment, you will feel better about both yourself and the organization. The organization will benefit greatly as you continue to bring your “A” game to the table, ultimately producing better relationships and results.

    Thank you, we look forward to hearing your thoughts. Let us know how you are doing.

    As always, we appreciate your attention, and for additional ideas, follow me on twitter: @HenryJEvans

    Like us on Facebook to share your experiences, or email us at moreinfo@dynamicresults.com.

    Thank you.

    Control Yourself Influence Others

    Control Yourself, Influence Others

    Hi, I’m Tom Blaisse, Certified Accountability Facilitator for Dynamic Results.

    In our Accountability Method workshops we help participants focus on the things they can control (or at least have some influence over) and adapt to the things they can’t control. When we feel we are not in control of a project or process, we may get upset, feel angry, irritated or frustrated. We may even give up; go home, and crack open a cold beer.

    Some people operate this way all the time. We all know who the pessimists are in our organizations. Pessimists often claim they can’t control anything. They might say, “I told you we couldn’t do it” or, “I knew that it wouldn’t work.” We call them CAVE people – Citizens Against Virtually Everything. Pessimists like to focus on the problem, not on the solution. The challenge for all of us is knowing where to focus our precious energy.

    In the late 80′s, Dr. Stephen R Covey, in his landmark book, 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, said that the most effective people adopt a pro-active mindset, means they focus their time and energy on the things they can control, or at least influence, and don’t waste time on things over which they have no control.

    CIC1

    This concept suggests that when we focus on the circle where we have both responsibility and authority to take action, our credibility grows; and we expand our circle of influence, thereby achieving greater results.

    CIC2

    In our research and development of the Accountability Method, we have found this concept to be true. The problem is, in observing our clients, we find that many of them spend too much meeting time, and email time focusing on areas that they may be concerned about, but have no direct control or influence over.

    Dr. Covey calls this the Circle of Concern. This circle contains all the things that we may worry about, but have no ability to control or influence – typically things that have to do with other people.

    CIC3

    We can’t really control other people. We may have some influence over them; or be able to motivate them with our vision of positive and/or negative consequences; but, we really don’t have direct control over what other people may think or do.

    It takes a pro-active mindset to focus your energy on the things you can control and influence, and to minimize or even eliminate the time you spend discussing things within your circle of concern. Structure your dialogues on those areas you can control. When you do, you will expand your circle of influence and ultimately be more effective. Make a commitment to take action today on something within your circle of control. Make a request of someone you might have influence over. And, decide to let go of anything you can’t control.

    CIC4

    Remember, the two effects of our human conditioning:

    1. We sometimes think we can control situations that we have no control over
    2. We sometimes think we cannot control situations that maybe we can control (or at least influence)

    Next week, look at all the meetings you will attend, and the conversations you may have. If you were to use this model as a filter for what you might say and do, what impact would it have on your personal effectiveness, and your effectiveness working with other people?

    At your meetings, request that you all just talk about those things within your respective circles of control or influence. If you hear one of those CAVE people bring up something up that is outside those spheres, decide to talk about it later – maybe over a cold beer.

    Thank you, we look forward to hearing your thoughts. Let us know how you are doing.

    As always, we appreciate your attention, and for additional ideas, follow me on twitter: @HenryJEvans

    Like us on Facebook to share your experiences, or email us at moreinfo@dynamicresults.com.

    Thank you.

    leadership-balance-thumb

    Leadership in Balance

    Hi, I’m Dr. Colm Foster, Senior Associate at Dynamic Results, and with my colleague Henry Evans, I co-authored Step Up, Lead In Six Moments That Matter. You can stay current with my ideas by following me on Twitter at @DrColmFoster.

    When working with our clients to develop Core Competency Models, they sometimes ask us about Key Leadership Traits and whether leaders are born or made. Much has been written about this topic. We believe that leadership is a developable skill but that the personality does play a role.

    Based on our work coaching and developing leaders, we believe optimism is a critical leadership trait. Holding a positive view of the future is a key part of leading teams and indeed of leading oneself. It’s also fundamental to bouncing back from setbacks; we sometimes refer to this as leadership resilience.

    However, unbridled optimism can lead to unhealthy outcomes. In fact, in another blog, Henry and I talked about the value of pessimism and how to leverage it for better relationships and business outcomes.

    When working with our clients we encourage them to temper their optimism with good reality testing. This means grounding your optimism with a solid grasp of the situation you are facing.

    So, our definition of the ideal leader?

    A person with high optimism – balanced with good reality testing.

    This sounds something like: I fully understand and appreciate all of the obstacles we face and knowing all of that I remain confident that we can deliver against our strategy objectives.

    Thank you for your continued interest. We look forward to bringing you additional Insights From Our Experts in future blogs.

    If you or your team want to deep dive on Stepping Up, contact us for information on keynotes, workshops and custom programs meant to ignite leadership at every level of your organization. Email Ede Ericson Cardell at: moreinfo@dynamicresults.com, or call 214-742-1403 x 106.

    attack-the-idea-not-the-person

    Attack the Idea, Not the Person

     


    With the successful launch of our new book, “Step Up, Lead In Six Moments That Matter” and with the global success of our best-selling book “Winning With Accountability, The Secret Language of High Performing Organizations” (now with over 100,000 in print), we are offering you some of our best insights and practices to create an Accountability Culture in, and generate leadership at every level of your organization.


    Henry Evans, Managing Partner, and Dr. Colm Foster, Senior Associate at Dynamic Results, are co-authors of “Step Up, Lead In Six Moments That Matter”. They are talking today about a problem we call ‘terminal politeness’.

    Follow Colm and Henry on Twitter: @DrColmFoster @HenryJEvans

    We often experience and diagnose terminal politeness in client organizations we work with. What we mean is, sometimes people are avoiding critical dialogues that they would be much better served having. This could be because they don’t recognize the need to have them, they don’t want to hurt someone’s feelings, they don’t want to overload someone or they might be afraid of how the other person might react. Whatever their reasons are, avoiding these critical issues can lead to a state of mediocrity. It can sometimes lead to people thinking, feeling and acting like we are okay just as we are and we have no need to improve.

    While that may be and feel okay at the time, if you have a dynamic environment and/or a competitor who is willing to have these discussions real time, it can lead you and your team having to have these critical conversations when it is too late. We believe the answer is to generate constructive conflict in your organization.

    Imagine a situation where I might say something that is completely stupid. How would you respond to that idea, demonstrating constructive conflict?

    For instance:

    We do strategic planning and leadership team offsites for clients, they take all day, I think we ought to get into the hot dog business! Our clients have to eat, why should we make money on feeding them?

    Attack the Idea:

    Henry, generally, I like and agree with your ideas. But, I am struggling to understand how getting into food service is going to serve our business, what might I be missing?

    What did Colm just do? He expressed confidence in our relationship and in my capability. Afterward, he directly attacked my idea without me being personally attacked and perhaps more importantly, without any need to defend myself.

    Here is an example when we were facilitating a meeting with clients. They were trying to solve a major cash flow problem. One of them suggests, maybe we should liquidate all of our inventory? His colleague said, hey, that’s a stupid idea. We will have nothing to sell and you will create a customer service disaster.

    That executive could have expressed that same sentiment in a slightly different way. It might have sounded like this: I know that you are looking for solutions that are going to generate quick cash flow for us. I also know you are committed to maintaining a high level of customer service, but, I am really failing to see how your last suggestion is going to do that. I think it would cause serious interruption to our service levels and what I would like to know from you is how can we maintain our service levels and still generate a quick cash flow?

    In short, you can avoid terminal politeness by generating appropriate, healthy conflict. One of the ways to do this is to attack the idea, not the person. You can get a deep dive on this in our new book, “Step Up, Lead In Six Moments That Matter”.

    Keep in mind, the other person is the judge of whether you have done this effectively or not. If they felt attacked, you have to show up differently with them next time.

    We always look forward to bringing you real life examples in our blogs. If you and your team ever want to do a deep dive on stepping up, contact us for information on keynotes, workshops and custom programs meant to ignite leadership at every level of your organization.

    For more information on how to bring the method to your team or about any of the services we offer, contact Ede Ericson Cardell, Director of Operations at moreinfo@dynamicresults.com or 214-742-1403 x 106.

    Driving Business Results Through Accountability Reframing

    Leading From Without

    In celebration of our tenth year and with the global success of our best-selling book “Winning With Accountability, The Secret Language of High Performing Organizations” (now in its ninth printing) we are offering you some of our best insights and practices to create an Accountability Culture in your workplace.


    Hi, I’m Henry Evans, founder of Dynamic Results and author of the best-selling business book “Winning with Accountability: The Secret Language of High Performing Organizations.” Today we’re talking about what we call, Leading From Without™.

    A few days ago I was working with a $7 billion dollar client organization, specifically one of their senior leaders. He opened up to me and explained that after exceeding all targets set for them last year, as a reward, their global office had given them even more aggressive targets this year. His team didn’t see how they could hit these targets and they asked him to explain how they could. He told me that he didn’t have the answer, didn’t see the solution and didn’t know what to do.

    I went in to this discussion armed with the information that he was very happy with the team he had and felt that he worked with smart and talented people.

    Leaning on my emotional intelligence training, I asked him how he felt about being vulnerable? Could he tell them that while he was committed to hitting the targets, he didn’t have the answer either and wanted to hear their ideas about how working together? Could he simply ask them, “How can we do this?”

    In short, that is exactly what he did. His team immediately switched from worrying about the problem to working on a solution. Our client lead with transparency, not arrogance. He lead with honesty and a request for help, rather than trying to “lead from the front” and have all the answers.

    We feel that relationships are built and strengthened in moments of vulnerability like this example. We prove that when we admit to our team that we don’t see the way – while still demonstrating a commitment to finding a solution. Sometimes, you can be a leader by leading from without (having all the answers).

    We encourage you to give this “leading from without” a try. This can work regardless of your position or title. If dealing with a boss who expects you to have all the answers, try saying something like “I feel confident you see how to do this, and right now, I don’t. Would you help me think it through?”

    We are speaking more about leading from anywhere on the org chart in our upcoming book, “Step Up, Lead in Six Moments that Matter”. As always, we appreciate your time and attention. For additional ideas, follow me on twitter: @HenryJEvans

    For more information on how to bring the method to your team or about any of the services we offer, contact Ede Ericson Cardell, Director of Operations at moreinfo@dynamicresults.com or 214-742-1403 x 106.


    Want to know more about creating accountable cultures? Take our free assessment and buy the book here. http://www.dynamicresults.com/book/

    As always, we welcome your comments. Like us on Facebook to share your experiences or email us at moreinfo@dynamicresults.com.