3 Rules for Choosing Your Accountability Partner & Getting Better Business Results

Today we want to talk to you about three rules for Driving Results through Accountability Partners.

We all know the concept of an accountability partner: Someone with whom we share our commitments, knowing that they will hold us accountable and responsible for executing what we told them we would do by when we said we would do it.

Here are some pitfalls of choosing the wrong accountability partner, along with some best practices for knowing whom you should pick.

Number One: Pick someone at the peer level: You should not pick your boss, and you should not pick any of your employees. Why? If you have people who work for you, or if you are working for someone, they may (or may not) have your best interests at heart. You want your partner to be someone at your peer level or someone outside of your organization.

When people are writing your performance review, (or when you are writing someone else’s), you are very unlikely to completely ignore things they told you they are trying to accomplish; things that you know they are not succeeding at.

Example: you might be writing a performance review for someone who is doing a fairly good job at work; and has said they are also trying to lose weight, cut back on Facebook time, and also, quit smoking. Because you know they failed at those, your perception is just a little bit lower than it might otherwise have been. And you, if you are like most human beings, are going on some level to let that impact your review. That would not be fair, because he or she is being rated on business performance, not on anything outside of business.

Number Two: Choose someone who has your best interests at heart. Further, we don’t want you to choose a person you are in competition with. So let’s talk about peers. If I have a peer that I am competing with, either for resources, or a promotion, that person is not a good accountability partner. My accountability partner has to have my best interests at heart.

Number Three: Choose someone who will be assertive and has the courage to tell me when I am messing up; or to challenge me when I am falling behind on a project, so I can achieve my desired business results, on time.

Having chosen an accountability partner, the burden is now on me to make it emotionally safe to challenge me when I am not keeping my commitments (and that’s what a coach must be able to do). So whether your accountability partner is a coach whom you hire externally, or someone whom you work with as a peer, or someone outside of the organization:

• We recommend that you get a partner, and soon.
• We recommend that you proactively publish your commitments and goals to that person; and
• That you make them feel emotionally safe when they do hold you accountable.

These are just a few of the ways you can drive better business results through using accountability partners.

Thank you for your continued interest, and we look forward to bringing you additional insights from our experts in future blogs.

If you want to learn more about Stepping Up, contact us.

As always, we welcome your comments. Join us on Facebook to share your experiences, or email us at [email protected]

Steps To Taking A Real Vacation

Six Steps For Taking A Real Vacation

by Dynamic Results

Steps To Taking A Real VacationDo you have trouble disconnecting from the office while on vacation? If so, you are not alone. Business Week reports that over 76 percent of executives said they work at least a few times a week, and 33 percent said they conduct business every single day.

Is this healthy?

The American Institute of Stress reports, “Increased levels of job stress have been demonstrated to be associated with increased rates of heart attack, hypertension and other disorders.”

Is this productive?

As executive coaches, we see the effects of prolonged stress on our clients every day: reduced focus, lack of energy, loss of enthusiasm and creativity; with increased negative interactions with team members. The Families and Work Institute found that overworked individuals are more likely to make mistakes.

So, our big question is: Is it really necessary to always take the office with you?

It is, if you haven’t done sufficient planning. Like everything else in business and life – insufficient planning leads to poor results.

One client, the President of an International Manufacturing company, candidly shares what so many others suffer through. “I normally practice the Robin Williams concept from the movie RV; I do my work when the family is asleep.”

Our Dynamic Results team is committed to demonstrating accountability; which goes way beyond getting things done on time. Being accountable includes taking good care of yourself and living life in a way that is nurturing for you and inspiring to the people with whom you live and work.

Here are a few tips to help boost your accountability for taking healthy and refreshing vacations:

  • A few weeks before leaving, review the status of your key projects. Decide what you will complete before leaving and what and to whom you will delegate remaining tasks.
  • Consult with all your team members and communicate to each one what you want them to handle while you’re away. Make sure to have them state their understanding of what you require to guard against mixed signals or other miscommunications.
  • Notify everyone concerned in your projects who will be responsible while you’re away; how to reach them, and when you’ll return.
  • Set your voice mail and email accounts to inform everyone you are out of the office on vacation.
  • Leave the day before and the day after your trip unscheduled. This will allow you to leave with confidence knowing that you have not only a manageable situation to return to, but time do deal with any unforeseen problems when you get back.
  • Most importantly – commit to letting go and not checking your email and voice mail while away.
  • Finally, make yourself accountable to your spouse and family by showing them this article.

One client, a SVP at a Global Manufacturing company advises that to develop strong, independent thinkers and doers, letting go while away gives all concerned the opportunity to rise to the next level.

Henry Evans, Managing Partner of Dynamic Results, shares, “I leave my computer behind. I do carry a cell phone in case of emergency, but usually leave it turned off and packed away. My objective is to focus on recharging and rejuvenating for a happier and more productive Henry when I return.”

As always, we welcome your comments. Join us on facebook to share your experiences or email us at [email protected].

Learn how to build a culture of accountability at your organization.

Find this article useful? If so, you might enjoy our book.

Corporate Leadership Expert Henry Evans

Keynote Highlights: Accountability as a Competitive Advantage: Driving Results Without Being a Jerk


Henry Evans, our Managing Partner and author of “Winning With Accountability, The Secret Language of High Performing Organizations” on the keynote circuit. Please click on the link above for our promotional video.

With the global success of our best-selling book “Winning With Accountability, The Secret Language of High Performing Organizations” (now with over 100,000 copies in print) we are changing the way teams all over the world are defining Accountability.

We have a team of certified trainers across the globe who are ready to bring the method to your teams. Our Director of Operations, Ede Ericson, is available to speak to you about Accountability or any of our Core Competencies. Please contact her anytime: [email protected] or 214-742-1403 x 106

Thank you again for your continued support of what we do!