Retaining Talent with Emotional Safety®

Bev Kaye and Henry Evans are best-selling authors willing to share unguarded hints on how to keep your best people (even these days!!!).

Generating Teamwork When People Have Differences

A robust and rapid-fire discussion on how to Feel, Talk and Act when people have differences. Hosted by Bonnie St. John and Henry Evans.

Why Tom Cruise Laying Into His Crew for Breaking Covid-19 Rules Is a Good Thing

ROME, ITALY – NOVEMBER 29, 2020: Actor Tom Cruise meets fans during a break from filming the movie Mission Impossible 7 – Libra, in Piazza Venezia -PHOTOGRAPH BY Ravagli/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Sometimes it’s OK for leaders to get mad. And show it.

Jeff Haden, contributing editor, Inc.com ties Tom Cruise’s outburst back to Emotional Safety®. From the Amazon Top 10 Business Book, Step Up, Lead In Six Moments That Matter, by Henry Evans and Colm Foster, PhD, we learn that the right emotions at the right times can deliver dynamic results.

Dynamic Results Welcomes Christopher Harrington as President

ChrisH

Cision / Global Read on Cision

[…] We are pleased to announce that our former client, Christopher Harrington (most recently serving as a Senior Executive in a large MNC), is now co-owner and President of Dynamic Results.

Chris utilized our services and methodologies while transforming his prior organization and has now joined Dynamic Results to lead the global scaling of our firm.

Our founder Henry Evans will remain CEO and we all welcome Chris to our Dynamic Results Family.

Read the press release here

Map Your Mood

Dr. David Caruso and Henry Evans talk moods and matching the task at hand to the mood you (or your team) are in.

Self Aware – Are You Really?

Dr. Beverly Kaye and Henry Evans discuss what it means to be self-aware in this lively 30-minute dialogue; Self Aware, Are You Really? Cues And Clues You May Be Missing.

The Four Impossible Tensions of Leading in a Crisis, 2

The continuation of our provocative conversation. Michael Bungay Stanier and Henry Evans spar, sear, explore, and collaborate through these tensions.

The Four Impossible Tensions of Leading in a Crisis, 1

Check out our provocative session as Michael Bungay Stanier and Henry Evans spar, sear, explore, and collaborate.

Managing a Global Organization Through Crisis: One Leader’s Perspective w/ Florian Bankoley

Our discussion with a former coaching client, Florian Bankoley who is leading an 8,000+ person international organization through this crisis. Learn how he is operating, what he is doing effectively and, what he may have missed.

Emotional Safety® – 3 rules for knowing when to fight (at work)

I was backstage about to give a speech to a large group of CLO’s who are seeking new ways to engage top talent while improving organizational performance…a difficult balance to achieve.

I spoke about how to keep high performers happy, largely through giving them a collaborative environment in which the best ideas often win. This gives your organization a Competitive Advantage.

Unfortunately and as humans, we are not wired to let the best ideas win. As humans, we are emotional first and rational second. This means that we usually fight when we feel like fighting, even if that is not the right time and/or person to be fighting with. Another way for you to think about this is to remember that we often fight because of how we feel, not because fighting may lead to the best outcome for the team.

You have a process for most things you do at work. Think of this is a 3-step filter for knowing when to and also, when not to fight.

We’ve got clients in more than 80 countries so let’s focus on a sign that all of us know, the traffic light. Red means stop, yellow means slow down, and green means go. In the context of fighting and in the spirit of leaving the room with the best idea, please use the traffic light in the following way:

  • If what you want to fight about is someone’s personality, you are in the red, Stop. Don’t have the argument. Wait until you can approach this type of issue, someone’s behavior for when you can be strategic and objective. This is about them, the most personal type of issue, and the most likely to make someone defensive.
  • If instead, you and others disagree on a process or a policy, you are in the yellow. This means Proceed with Caution and also with a time limit. For example, say something like, “we will dedicate the next 90 minutes to arrive at a conclusion. The first hour will be spent hearing everyone present their perspectives, and challenge one another. The last half hour will be deciding which option we will go with”
  • Finally, if what you disagree about is a strategy or an action plan, you are in the green, Argue all Day. Argue until you get what 80% or more of your people agree is an 80% (or better) solution. If you are the boss and this is your decision to make, still present the opportunity for people to fight for their ideas, and then make the call.
  • In short, know when fighting will serve you and also, potentially hurt you by following our traffic light process.

    The concepts we published in our Amazon Top 10 book, Step Up Lead in Six Moments that Matter have been covered by Forbes, Fast Company, Inc., the Washington Post and others.

    Today I’m talking about when to fight, make sure you check out our other blog called “Get Angry, Not Stupid” so you know HOW to fight.

    As always, we appreciate your time. For additional ideas, follow me on twitter:@HenryJEvans